Team Sarakshan

Chennai, India

  • Education / Awareness / News
  • Food Waste / Consumer Issues
  • Asia

Our Team

#standupsnackup / Published October 31, 2014 by Saloni Bansal

#standupsnackup

Design Statement / Published October 24, 2014 by pratyaksh agarwal

Design Statement

"The world currently produces enough food for everybody, but many people do not have access to it." Food is a lot like money: just because some people have none doesn't mean that there isn't enough of it--it's just spread unevenly.”

Insight Statements / Published October 24, 2014 by pratyaksh agarwal

Insight Statements

• Climate change is rapidly pushing the world’s poorest people – those least responsible for it – to the limits of subsistence. Changes in climate are affecting the sustainability of agricultural systems and disrupting production.
Unless the emissions of GHGs are curbed .. changes in temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables will undoubtedly affect agriculture around the world
• World hunger is defined in a technical way through malnutrition. Malnutrition is characterized by inadequate intake of protein, energy and micronutrients and by frequent infections and diseases. Starved of the right nutrition, people will die from common infections like measles or diarrhoea.
Malnutrition is measured not by how much food is eaten but by physical measurements of the body - weight or height - and age.
• The world produces enough food to feed everyone. World agriculture produces 17 percent more calories per person today than it did 30 years ago, despite a 70 percent population increase. This is enough to provide everyone in the world with at least 2,720 kilocalories (kcal) per person per day according to the most recent estimate that we could find (FAO 2002, p.9). The principal problem is that many people in the world do not have sufficient land to grow, or income to purchase, enough food.

Global issues! / Published October 17, 2014 by Saloni Bansal

Global issues!

1.

While nearly a billion people around the world go hungry, we waste one third of the food produced globally.
So, why the disparity between food production and consumption in developed versus developing countries?
Food waste in high income countries happens at the consumer level, like what you leave on the dinner table. In developed countries, we throw away as much as half of the food we buy.
Food waste in developing countries happens at the post-harvest & processing stages: Lack of modern transport, storage infrastructure and financial, managerial and technical limitations contribute to these losses.
The total amount of food waste in industrialized countries is as high as the total net food produced by sub-Saharan Africa.

2.

Wasted food means lost resources and unnecessary environmental fallout. Take energy, for example: Estimates show an average of seven to ten calories worth of energy input is needed to produce one calorie of food. (Beef production requires even more—an average of 35 calories per one calorie of food.) Much of that energy comes from burning fossil fuels. When food is wasted, it “potentially contributes to unnecessary global warming” says the IME.
In the U.S., wasted food contributes 33 million tons of trash to landfills, where it proceeds to decompose, producing 25 percent of U.S. methane emissions.
Additionally, 550 billion cubic meters of water are also wasted globally to irrigate crops that never reach the consumer.

3.

Recent studies have outlined the devastating effect that hunger and under-nutrition can have on the lives of individuals, communities and national economies. Data from a series of studies called the Cost of Hunger in Africa has shown that hunger is capable of reducing a nation's workforce by 9.4% and national GDPs by up to 16.5%, severely limiting a developing country's ability to make much needed investments and grow.

Idea parking! / Published October 17, 2014 by Saloni Bansal

Idea parking!

Our Mission

Hunger kills more people every year than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined! At Sarakshan, we pledge to leave no stone unturned to fight against the problem of hunger and food wastage. About 10% of India’s food rots in warehouses before it is distributed! Despite the economic boom over the last decade, India ranks 65th out of 79 countries on the Global Hunger Index. If these figures do not appal you, we wonder what will! It is high time in our day to ramp up our efforts to eliminate hunger and food wastage!

Our Background

We believe that hunger is caused by poverty and inequality, not scarcity. Through this challenge, we wish to end this inequality so that no one goes to bed with an empty stomach.

#standupsnackup / Published October 31, 2014 by Saloni Bansal

#standupsnackup

Design Statement / Published October 24, 2014 by pratyaksh agarwal

Design Statement

"The world currently produces enough food for everybody, but many people do not have access to it." Food is a lot like money: just because some people have none doesn't mean that there isn't enough of it--it's just spread unevenly.”

Insight Statements / Published October 24, 2014 by pratyaksh agarwal

Insight Statements

• Climate change is rapidly pushing the world’s poorest people – those least responsible for it – to the limits of subsistence. Changes in climate are affecting the sustainability of agricultural systems and disrupting production.
Unless the emissions of GHGs are curbed .. changes in temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables will undoubtedly affect agriculture around the world
• World hunger is defined in a technical way through malnutrition. Malnutrition is characterized by inadequate intake of protein, energy and micronutrients and by frequent infections and diseases. Starved of the right nutrition, people will die from common infections like measles or diarrhoea.
Malnutrition is measured not by how much food is eaten but by physical measurements of the body - weight or height - and age.
• The world produces enough food to feed everyone. World agriculture produces 17 percent more calories per person today than it did 30 years ago, despite a 70 percent population increase. This is enough to provide everyone in the world with at least 2,720 kilocalories (kcal) per person per day according to the most recent estimate that we could find (FAO 2002, p.9). The principal problem is that many people in the world do not have sufficient land to grow, or income to purchase, enough food.

Global issues! / Published October 17, 2014 by Saloni Bansal

Global issues!

1.

While nearly a billion people around the world go hungry, we waste one third of the food produced globally.
So, why the disparity between food production and consumption in developed versus developing countries?
Food waste in high income countries happens at the consumer level, like what you leave on the dinner table. In developed countries, we throw away as much as half of the food we buy.
Food waste in developing countries happens at the post-harvest & processing stages: Lack of modern transport, storage infrastructure and financial, managerial and technical limitations contribute to these losses.
The total amount of food waste in industrialized countries is as high as the total net food produced by sub-Saharan Africa.

2.

Wasted food means lost resources and unnecessary environmental fallout. Take energy, for example: Estimates show an average of seven to ten calories worth of energy input is needed to produce one calorie of food. (Beef production requires even more—an average of 35 calories per one calorie of food.) Much of that energy comes from burning fossil fuels. When food is wasted, it “potentially contributes to unnecessary global warming” says the IME.
In the U.S., wasted food contributes 33 million tons of trash to landfills, where it proceeds to decompose, producing 25 percent of U.S. methane emissions.
Additionally, 550 billion cubic meters of water are also wasted globally to irrigate crops that never reach the consumer.

3.

Recent studies have outlined the devastating effect that hunger and under-nutrition can have on the lives of individuals, communities and national economies. Data from a series of studies called the Cost of Hunger in Africa has shown that hunger is capable of reducing a nation's workforce by 9.4% and national GDPs by up to 16.5%, severely limiting a developing country's ability to make much needed investments and grow.

Idea parking! / Published October 17, 2014 by Saloni Bansal

Idea parking!

Our Team

Our Mission

Hunger kills more people every year than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined! At Sarakshan, we pledge to leave no stone unturned to fight against the problem of hunger ...Read More

Our Background

We believe that hunger is caused by poverty and inequality, not scarcity. Through this challenge, we wish to end this inequality so that no one goes to bed ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.