Team HASAT

New York, USA

  • Business / Social Enterprise
  • Food Waste / Consumer Issues
  • Global

Our Team

Our calendar / Published October 31, 2014 by Allison Stewart

Our calendar

team HASAT is creating our team calendar! the green post-its are our homework for the next week.

Our Modern Conundrum: Food Waste & Food Insecurity / Published September 19, 2014 by Adriana Fernandes-Halloran

Our Modern Conundrum: Food Waste & Food Insecurity

In india, annually, over 40 percent of the fresh fruits and vegetables, a figure worth approximately $8.3 billion, perishes before reaching consumer. Meanwhile, food insecurity is still prevalent in India and the average household spends nearly 30% of their monthly income in food. In the United States, postharvest waste also poses great socioeconomic challenges presently, and especially for the future of food security. While 40 percent of the food available annually goes to waste, nearly 49 million Americans face food insecurity.

What is Postharvest Waste Mitigation / Published September 19, 2014 by Ayse Sabuncu

What is Postharvest Waste Mitigation

Postharvest activities refers to the various points in the value chain from production in the field to processing, distribution, consumption and post-consumption. Losses of fresh produce are a major problem in the postharvest chain and yet, it remains largely an invisible problem! Food is wasted at farms when produce is not harvested due to market dynamics, or because it cannot withstand the average 1,500 miles journey from farm to supermarket, and once at store, tons of food may go to waste because its appearance does not satisfy a customer’s expectations (largely influenced by advertising), even if perfectly edible. Other resources are squandered when food goes wasted: a significant amount of landmass, energy consumption and fresh water goes into producing food every year. And because refuse is turned into decaying trash in landfills, food waste produces a significant amount of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

Our Mission

Mission: We are committed to foster a more sustainable and food secure future by creating an innovative distribution channel to reduce postharvest losses, avoid food waste and make possible for larger institutions working with marginalized communities, such as schools and hospitals, to buy regionally, nutrient-dense, sustainably produced food. Our Approach: A growing body of research, supports the argument that distortions in the food supply is not a problem of production, but rather of distribution and economic inequality, and thats where policy and systemic approaches are required. HASAT, will create a platform for farmers and retailers to better manage and reduce food waste, by aggregating and adding value to produce before it becomes waste.

Our Background

Adriana:Adriana is passionate about the intersection of Food Systems, Sustainability and Social Innovation. Originally from Brazil, she has nearly ten years of experience in International Development and Social Innovation in Latin America, Africa, India and the United States. Allison: Allison is currently pursuing her Masters in Food Systems in NYU. She is also a passionate beekeeper interested in the intersection of ecosystem stewardship and fostering a more livable future. Ayse: Originally from Turkey, Ayse is currently getting her MBA at NYU Stern focusing on Social Impact and Innovation. After 5 years in the banking industry, she has decided to merge her finance background with her passion for the social impact sector. Her research in market solutions for agriculture in Africa and India has instigated her desire to pursue innovation for a more sustainable food system.

Our calendar / Published October 31, 2014 by Allison Stewart

Our calendar

team HASAT is creating our team calendar! the green post-its are our homework for the next week.

Our Modern Conundrum: Food Waste & Food Insecurity / Published September 19, 2014 by Adriana Fernandes-Halloran

Our Modern Conundrum: Food Waste & Food Insecurity

In india, annually, over 40 percent of the fresh fruits and vegetables, a figure worth approximately $8.3 billion, perishes before reaching consumer. Meanwhile, food insecurity is still prevalent in India and the average household spends nearly 30% of their monthly income in food. In the United States, postharvest waste also poses great socioeconomic challenges presently, and especially for the future of food security. While 40 percent of the food available annually goes to waste, nearly 49 million Americans face food insecurity.

What is Postharvest Waste Mitigation / Published September 19, 2014 by Ayse Sabuncu

What is Postharvest Waste Mitigation

Postharvest activities refers to the various points in the value chain from production in the field to processing, distribution, consumption and post-consumption. Losses of fresh produce are a major problem in the postharvest chain and yet, it remains largely an invisible problem! Food is wasted at farms when produce is not harvested due to market dynamics, or because it cannot withstand the average 1,500 miles journey from farm to supermarket, and once at store, tons of food may go to waste because its appearance does not satisfy a customer’s expectations (largely influenced by advertising), even if perfectly edible. Other resources are squandered when food goes wasted: a significant amount of landmass, energy consumption and fresh water goes into producing food every year. And because refuse is turned into decaying trash in landfills, food waste produces a significant amount of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

Our Team

Our Mission

Mission: We are committed to foster a more sustainable and food secure future by creating an innovative distribution channel to reduce postharvest losses, avoid food waste and make ...Read More

Our Background

Adriana:Adriana is passionate about the intersection of Food Systems, Sustainability and Social Innovation. Originally from Brazil, she has nearly ten years of experience in International Development and Social ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.