Team Ghana School Farms Project

Cape Coast, Ghana

  • Business / Social Enterprise
  • Hunger / Obesity
  • Africa

Our Team

Operation "Feed your School" / Published September 21, 2014 by Alfred Godwin Adjabeng

Operation "Feed your School"


Ghana School Farms Project is aim at achieving Food Security, Employment and Education Goal. It’s an innovative idea aimed at driving local “agropreneurship” through it “I’m a Farmer” Advocacy Campaign.

Ghana School Farms is a project of Reach Out to Future Leaders Movement (ROFLM). The project primarily aims at working toward food security through the educational system. “It will not only help keep students in school who are currently attending, but also can increase accessibility to education for those who are not in school.” The success of this project will contribute to Achieving Universal Primary Education (MDG 2) and Eradicating Extreme Hunger and Poverty (MDG 1).

Over the last two years, most public senior high schools in the three northern regions of Ghana experienced closure due to the unavailability of food to feed the students.
This situation was blamed on the unavailability of feeding grants and also the delay in the release of feeding grants by government.

In the quest to improve access to primary education, the Government of Ghana introduced the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE) to enable the ordinary Ghanaian to have access to quality basic education at little or no cost. Subsequently, the government introduced a highly subsidized senior high school education to make it more attractive and accessible to Ghanaians.

One of the components in the subsidy package is a highly subsidized feeding grant. The commencement of this grant was promising but later turned out to be a difficult scheme to sustain hence making the goal still unrealized.
Most of the government’s public senior high schools operate on a boarding system, which means the students are accommodated and fed by the schools. Due to the limited number of senior high schools, the boarding system helps students to access schools which are far from their communities of residence.

The boarding system also creates the space where young people are morally, psychologically, and spiritually prepared for the future, and creates a platform for cross-cultural relationship building.

It is therefore important to note that the challenges facing the school feeding grant regime, if not addressed, will have dire consequences for the accessibility and affordability of education for most Ghanaian children and youth.

Overcoming such challenges that disrupt educational systems will mean the provision of sustainable economic machinery that will help provide continuously available and highly nutritious agricultural products for feeding, as well as internal economic ventures to provide for their other basic needs.

Recognizing this challenge, ROFLM is launching the Ghana School Farms Project to enable a food security program that ensures a continuous educational calendar. This project will be a stakeholder-oriented project, involving the school, community, Parent-Teacher Associations, Ministry of Food and Agriculture, and Ministry of Education, with ROFLM serving as facilitators for the smooth implementation of this project. The stakeholders are carefully chosen because of the services they will be rendering for the success of the project.

The school will host the project, the community will provide the land, the Parent-Teacher Association will negotiate the monitoring of the project, and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture will provide technical expertise on the project implementation while ROFLM handles oversight of the project. All the stakeholders will hold a dialogue to determine the best approach for getting labor for the manual work.

Agriculture is defined as one of the economic pillars within the developmental agenda of Ghana, with food security as a primary goal. The ability and passion of young people can be harnessed to promote this sector and this will in turn contribute to the promotion of economic and social development.
The project has in itself the ability to change young people’s perception of agriculture. The engagement of young people in the project will build a culture that challenges the status quo, which sees farming as uneducated, unskilled, and with low economic returns. As Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture has noted, modern agriculture is more than tilling the soil and rearing animals.

We believe that the involvement of schools in this project will enable them to see the agricultural sector as offering career opportunities in research, environment, financial management, engineering, and other technical areas for youth to explore.

Our Mission

Over the last two years, most public senior high schools in the three northern regions of Ghana experienced closure due to the unavailability of food to feed the students. This situation was blamed on the unavailability of feeding grants and also the delay in the release of feeding grants by government. In the quest to improve access to primary education, the Government of Ghana introduced the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE) to enable the ordinary Ghanaian to have access to quality basic education at little or no cost. Subsequently, the government introduced a highly subsidized senior high school education to make it more attractive and accessible to Ghanaians. One of the components in the subsidy package is a highly subsidized feeding grant. The commencement of this grant was promising but later turned out to be a difficult scheme to sustain hence making the goal still unrealized. Most of the government’s public senior high schools operate on a boarding system, which means the students are accommodated and fed by the schools. Due to the limited number of senior high schools, the boarding system helps students to access schools which are far from their communities of residence. The boarding system also creates the space where young people are morally, psychologically, and spiritually prepared for the future, and creates a platform for cross-cultural relationship building. It is therefore important to note that the challenges facing the school feeding grant regime, if not addressed, will have dire consequences for the accessibility and affordability of education for most Ghanaian children and youth. Overcoming such challenges that disrupt educational systems will mean the provision of sustainable economic machinery that will help provide continuously available and highly nutritious agricultural products for feeding, as well as internal economic ventures to provide for their other basic needs. Recognizing this challenge, we are launching the Ghana School Farms Project to enable a food security program that ensures a continuous educational calendar. This project will be a stakeholder-oriented project, involving the school, community, Parent-Teacher Associations, Ministry of Food and Agriculture, and Ministry of Education, with us serving as facilitators for the smooth implementation of this project. The stakeholders are carefully chosen because of the services they will be rendering for the success of the project. The school will host the project, the community will provide the land, the Parent-Teacher Association will negotiate the monitoring of the project, and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture will provide technical expertise on the project implementation while we handles oversight of the project. All the stakeholders will hold a dialogue to determine the best approach for getting labor for the manual work. Agriculture is defined as one of the economic pillars within the developmental agenda of Ghana, with food security as a primary goal. The ability and passion of young people can be harnessed to promote this sector and this will in turn contribute to the promotion of economic and social development. The project has in itself the ability to change young people’s perception of agriculture. The engagement of young people in the project will build a culture that challenges the status quo, which sees farming as uneducated, unskilled, and with low economic returns. As Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture has noted, modern agriculture is more than tilling the soil and rearing animals. We believe that the involvement of schools in this project will enable them to see the agricultural sector as offering career opportunities in research, environment, financial management, engineering, and other technical areas for youth to explore. LOCATION AND SCALE OF PROJECT The project will be located in the schools of implementation. The prototype projects will start from the three northern regions i.e. Northern Regions of Ghana, Upper East Region, Upper West Region and Northern Region of Ghana and then grow to cover other parts of the country. These regions were the most affected with the problem. The project will partner host schools, the portion of the school or community land will be allocated for the project. Base on the advice of the ministry of food and agriculture, the project will grow crops and rear some animals. The land acquired from the school or the community would be used to grow the crops and rear the animals. Since the project is a stakeholder oriented project, contributions will be by all, and would have mutual benefits. The project will begin with one school from each region as a pilot project; i.e. Kandiga Senior High School in the Upper East Region, Bimbila Senior High School in the Northern Region and Lassia-Tuolu in the Upper West Region after which it will be scaled up to cover the remaining schools in these respective Regions. The project will partner the Ministry Of Food and Agriculture in those respective Regions to provide technical assistance for the smooth implementation of the project. They would as well provide the seedling and animals at a subsidized cost and this will be taken care of by us. The Ministry of Food and Agriculture’s technical advice and assistance will form an integral part of the project. Aware of the challenge of ordering food supply across regions because they are not cultivated locally, the project will contract the service of a dietitian to redesign the menu of these respective school so they can get the best protein from what they have cultivated locally. The excess of the food cultivated by the project will be sold and the funds generated from these sales will be used to pay the school’s utility bills and for extra curriculum activities all in the quest of promoting very efficient, quality and highly accessible education. In order to scale up the implementation process and achieve realistic results, the project will be stakeholder-oriented.

Our Background

Our Team is part of Reach Out to Future Leaders Movement (ROFLM) a registered youth-led organisation in Ghana that seeks to provide a platform for young people to be educated for local development action and also adopts a community-based grassroots approach to partner young people as change agents in their respective communities. Our primary focus is Youth in Civic Engagement, Youth in Community Development, Youth in Agriculture and Leadership Development. ROFLM operates a curriculum based on the three themes: Educate, Empower and Engage. We provide Education on critical-thinking, skills acquisition in basic technological tools for communication. We Empower them by creating citizenship awareness that puts them up as change agents to deal with their own local community challenges. We Engage them by providing them with the necessary tool kits and concepts to enable them commit the education and empowerment for action and also in our projects so as to give them practical on the ground skills to take action. Our VISION To see a more proactive and vibrant youth that seeks to focus their strength as critical thinkers and problem solvers to create an effective, operative and independent community that meets its own needs Our MISSION To Educate, Empower and Engage young people in implementing visionary solutions to communal challenges Our PROGRAM GOALS: A Community in which young people are actively engaged towards its development A Community that seek to integrate young people in their developmental agenda A Community in which young people are provided a platform to contribute their quota to development as it also seeks to nurture their potentials

Operation "Feed your School" / Published September 21, 2014 by Alfred Godwin Adjabeng

Operation "Feed your School"


Ghana School Farms Project is aim at achieving Food Security, Employment and Education Goal. It’s an innovative idea aimed at driving local “agropreneurship” through it “I’m a Farmer” Advocacy Campaign.

Ghana School Farms is a project of Reach Out to Future Leaders Movement (ROFLM). The project primarily aims at working toward food security through the educational system. “It will not only help keep students in school who are currently attending, but also can increase accessibility to education for those who are not in school.” The success of this project will contribute to Achieving Universal Primary Education (MDG 2) and Eradicating Extreme Hunger and Poverty (MDG 1).

Over the last two years, most public senior high schools in the three northern regions of Ghana experienced closure due to the unavailability of food to feed the students.
This situation was blamed on the unavailability of feeding grants and also the delay in the release of feeding grants by government.

In the quest to improve access to primary education, the Government of Ghana introduced the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE) to enable the ordinary Ghanaian to have access to quality basic education at little or no cost. Subsequently, the government introduced a highly subsidized senior high school education to make it more attractive and accessible to Ghanaians.

One of the components in the subsidy package is a highly subsidized feeding grant. The commencement of this grant was promising but later turned out to be a difficult scheme to sustain hence making the goal still unrealized.
Most of the government’s public senior high schools operate on a boarding system, which means the students are accommodated and fed by the schools. Due to the limited number of senior high schools, the boarding system helps students to access schools which are far from their communities of residence.

The boarding system also creates the space where young people are morally, psychologically, and spiritually prepared for the future, and creates a platform for cross-cultural relationship building.

It is therefore important to note that the challenges facing the school feeding grant regime, if not addressed, will have dire consequences for the accessibility and affordability of education for most Ghanaian children and youth.

Overcoming such challenges that disrupt educational systems will mean the provision of sustainable economic machinery that will help provide continuously available and highly nutritious agricultural products for feeding, as well as internal economic ventures to provide for their other basic needs.

Recognizing this challenge, ROFLM is launching the Ghana School Farms Project to enable a food security program that ensures a continuous educational calendar. This project will be a stakeholder-oriented project, involving the school, community, Parent-Teacher Associations, Ministry of Food and Agriculture, and Ministry of Education, with ROFLM serving as facilitators for the smooth implementation of this project. The stakeholders are carefully chosen because of the services they will be rendering for the success of the project.

The school will host the project, the community will provide the land, the Parent-Teacher Association will negotiate the monitoring of the project, and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture will provide technical expertise on the project implementation while ROFLM handles oversight of the project. All the stakeholders will hold a dialogue to determine the best approach for getting labor for the manual work.

Agriculture is defined as one of the economic pillars within the developmental agenda of Ghana, with food security as a primary goal. The ability and passion of young people can be harnessed to promote this sector and this will in turn contribute to the promotion of economic and social development.
The project has in itself the ability to change young people’s perception of agriculture. The engagement of young people in the project will build a culture that challenges the status quo, which sees farming as uneducated, unskilled, and with low economic returns. As Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture has noted, modern agriculture is more than tilling the soil and rearing animals.

We believe that the involvement of schools in this project will enable them to see the agricultural sector as offering career opportunities in research, environment, financial management, engineering, and other technical areas for youth to explore.

Our Team

Our Mission

Over the last two years, most public senior high schools in the three northern regions of Ghana experienced closure due to the unavailability of food to feed the ...Read More

Our Background

Our Team is part of Reach Out to Future Leaders Movement (ROFLM) a registered youth-led organisation in Ghana that seeks to provide a platform for young people to ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.