Diversifly

black soldier flies as a solution for alternative protein production

We propose to use black soldier fly larvae to decompose organic waste and to produce high quality animal protein

Tags:
  • composting
  • waste utilization
  • black soldier fly
  • insect
  • entomophagy
  • maggot

Use Case

People can recycle organic waste and use it as feedstock for rearing black soldier fly larvae, and use the larvae for the animal feed as a protein and lipid source

Potential

It dramatically increase the efficiency on how we use our food. Soldier fly larvae are able to pick up the nutrients in the waste which are otherwise not available to human.

Business Case

We using EBEAM technology to extract the protein and lipid from the soldier fly larvae, and present the product as powder. The product will be sold for ingredient of food production, such as bread and cookies.

Objectives:

  1. Optimize the efficiency of solider fly larvae productions
  2. Using EBEAM to extract the protein and lipid
  3. Enriching the food product with our product

Team Diversifly

College Station, TX, United States

  • Science / Engineering
  • Agricultural Production / Productivity
  • Global

Our Team

Final Cuts / Published December 6, 2014 by Mandy Tinder

Final Cuts

With the competition deadline fast approaching, we are putting the last finishing touches on our videos to submit them just in time!

Making Our Videos / Published December 6, 2014 by Mandy Tinder

Making Our Videos

We're hard at work putting the finishing touches on our pitch video before the deadline tomorrow!

Our Brainstorming Session / Published December 5, 2014 by Mandy Tinder

Our Brainstorming Session

This is a photo I took of the white board we used for our first brainstorming session a few weeks ago. We already knew we wanted to work with the black soldier fly, but we wanted to narrow down our focus and really define what we wanted to do with them.

Black Soldier Flies featured in National Geographic / Published November 21, 2014 by Brittny Jones

Black Soldier Flies featured in National Geographic

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/10/141029-maggot-flies-bodies-video-forensics-science/

National Geographic stopped by our lab back in October to learn about the importance of black soldier flies, blowflies, and flesh flies in the field of forensic entomology. Check out this video! GO TAMU!

Final Logo Design / Published November 20, 2014 by Brittny Jones

Final Logo Design

This was our final logo design! Even though the others looked fantastic, we felt that this accurately represents our team name and mission! Thanks to TK Graphic Design for a job well done!

Our Mission

Diversifly, consists of two PhD and three Masters students from Texas A&M University. We call ourselves Diversifly because we want to diversify food options by introducing flies as a food source. The five of us work together at the FLIES facility where we maintain a black soldier fly colony for our thesis and dissertation research in Entomology. We believe that black soldier flies are the solution to the central question posed by the Thought For Food challenge: How do we feed our growing global population?

Our Background

Research has shown that insects can be used as a food source. In fact, historically insects have been eaten around the world. Recent demand for protein has led to a search for alternative protein production methods. Insect farming represent a cheaper, more compact, and cleaner alternative to traditional livestock, poultry, and aquaculture methods. Studies have shown that insects contain more protein per kilogram of body mass than traditional farm animals. Insects commonly explored as sources of food include crickets, mealworms, grasshoppers, etc. Unlike other commonly consumed insects, black soldier flies are not considered a pest species. They are generalist detritovores, and are well known decomposers of kitchen waste and manure. In addition, they do not directly transmit disease, and have even been shown to reduce E. Coli in manure. This species is easy to rear in a relatively short amount of time with minimal labor required, making it a perfect candidate for food production. There is a taboo against insect consumption, and current legislation leaves a gray area concerning what is allowable. However, we believe that with E-Beam technology, the protein from black soldier fly prepupae can be isolated to circumvent this problem. This technology will allow us to maximize this resource for protein production. Therefore we believe that these flies are the solution to our global food deficit.

Final Cuts / Published December 6, 2014 by Mandy Tinder

Final Cuts

With the competition deadline fast approaching, we are putting the last finishing touches on our videos to submit them just in time!

Making Our Videos / Published December 6, 2014 by Mandy Tinder

Making Our Videos

We're hard at work putting the finishing touches on our pitch video before the deadline tomorrow!

Our Brainstorming Session / Published December 5, 2014 by Mandy Tinder

Our Brainstorming Session

This is a photo I took of the white board we used for our first brainstorming session a few weeks ago. We already knew we wanted to work with the black soldier fly, but we wanted to narrow down our focus and really define what we wanted to do with them.

Black Soldier Flies featured in National Geographic / Published November 21, 2014 by Brittny Jones

Black Soldier Flies featured in National Geographic

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/10/141029-maggot-flies-bodies-video-forensics-science/

National Geographic stopped by our lab back in October to learn about the importance of black soldier flies, blowflies, and flesh flies in the field of forensic entomology. Check out this video! GO TAMU!

Final Logo Design / Published November 20, 2014 by Brittny Jones

Final Logo Design

This was our final logo design! Even though the others looked fantastic, we felt that this accurately represents our team name and mission! Thanks to TK Graphic Design for a job well done!

Our Team

Our Mission

Diversifly, consists of two PhD and three Masters students from Texas A&M University. We call ourselves Diversifly because we want to diversify food options by introducing flies as ...Read More

Our Background

Research has shown that insects can be used as a food source. In fact, historically insects have been eaten around the world. Recent demand for protein has led ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.