Phosphorus Donation

A free toilet-visit in return for your phosphorus donation

The public facility explains that regaining Phosphorus from urine can secure our future’s food supply and that viable solutions exist!

Use Case

It is easy to spot the eye-catching entrée of the facility. Our app can even direct you there! The facility is run by the donation-nurses who are happy to assist and maintain the facility. On several points you will receive information or feedback in a playful manner. The special no-mix toilet in the restroom allows you to make a valuable donation by keeping your excreta separated without compromising on any comforts for you. Generative feedback informs you in an intuitive way. While washing your hands you can have a peek behind the scenes as a rewarding feedback. During rush hours the information area serves as the perfect waiting room. For the curious visitors there are fertilizer-samples available in the automat. In return for your donation the service is free of charge.

Potential

Modern agriculture relies on fertilizer. The supply of phosphorus rock, one of the main minerals of fertilizer, by 2050, will be at a critically low level.Urine can be an alternative source. By using synergy effects, not only the scarce phosphorus, but also the fertilizer components potassium and nitrogen can be won directly from the same source. Regaining the nutrients from one person's urine is enough to support the growth of the plants needed to feed one person. By converting a public sanitation facility into a donation centre, the phosphorus issue will be highlighted and a new generation of sustainable sanitation will be introduced.The concept has its focus on central European countries, to implement an alternative role model, where conventional water sanitation is strongly rooted.

Business Case

With the rising demand, the value of phosphorus and thereby urine will increase. Fertilizer companies or farmers can buy the collected hygienized raw urine or the further refined product Struvite, a powder fertilizer.Another source of income is the rental of the service itself to cities and organisations of public events.Once the service is economically sustainable, it enables us to provide a free service and so increase the number of donations. As a financial backup, a user fee can be taken into consideration, though this would cross with the concept donation.Apart from investors, we expect financial support for the realisation of either mobile or permanent facilities from governments and NGO’s, as sustainable sanitation is an important upcoming topic.

Objectives:

  1. The Phosphorus Donation aims to create awareness on the user level about sustainable sanitation and its connection to food security.
  2. Using the phosphorus issue, fertilizer fabricants and farmers can be animated to use the human waste streams as resources.
  3. Present sustainable sanitation as a viable alternative to conventional water sanitation in the middle european context.

Team the Phosphorus Donation

Weimar, Germany

  • Education / Awareness / News
  • Environment / Sustainability
  • Europe

Our Team

Want to dig in deaper into the toilet research scene? / Published February 12, 2015 by Michel

Want to dig in deaper into the toilet research scene?

Check out iPiT on: http://ipit-news.blogspot.de
Twitter: ttps://twitter.com/iPiT_News

Greetings from the b.is (Bauhaus Institute for Infrastructure Solutions)

Team of the Phosphorus Donation, working on the final pitch

The user experience / Published November 29, 2014 by Sylvia Debit

The user experience

The user will go through 4 steps during his visit in the phosphorus donation that will give him information in an intuitive and playful manner.

The permanent and the mobile facility / Published November 29, 2014 by Sylvia Debit

The permanent and the mobile facility

The phosphorus donation can be find in a mobile version for festivals or events as well as in a permanent version in city centers.
Here you can see the mobile version.

The win-win situation of the no-mix sanitation system / Published November 29, 2014 by Sylvia Debit

The win-win situation of the no-mix sanitation system

The no-mix sanitation system does not only collect valuable resources as nutrients. It also saves water by using only 1,5 liter per flush.

Our Mission

Modern agriculture relies on extra nutrients, especially Phosphorus, in order to secure the worlds’ food supply. In an estimated 50 years, Phosphorus supplies from mines will be at a critically low level. Phosphorus is essential for fertilization as it is required for a plant to grow. This also means that all our food contains these nutrients. The great thing is, is that we excrete these nutrients again - mainly via our urine. Today we use six litters of drinking water to flush those valuable nutrients, but also hormones and problematic drug residues down the drain, several times a day. Our current treatment plants are unable to fully filter out these materials, so they end up in natural waters. This not only endangers the valuable resource Phosphorus, but consequently harms our ecosystem as well. The Phosphorus Donation is the solution for the Phosphorus scarcity. This public service provides the visitor with a free toilet visit in return for a phosphorus donation. The facility introduces the visitor to sustainable sanitation and makes it also possible to extract the valuable Phosphorus from the collected urine in a later stage. The design of the facility enables its visitors to understand the value of Phosphorus in an intuitive and engaging manner. The facility has the ability to spark public awareness; it has the means to communicate to its visitors the realization that valuable resources are wasted through using conventional water sanitation. Instead of simply disposing something, this alternative toilet facility allows the visitor to make a valuable donation; through this experience the visitor will realize the value of excreta. It allows its visitors a sneak peek into the treatment process which could break down certain preconceptions. The facility not only highlights its users with this critical issue, but also presents a viable alternative to preserve this resource. The alternative no-mix technique enables the separate collection of urine and faeces. This thereby simplifies the treatment and improves the quality of its re-use. The need for food and proper sanitation are universal requirements, and the practice of donating is an incredibly effective method of unified humanitarian effort. These truths transcend above all cultures and religions, making the Phosphorus donation centre beneficial for all. Although especially in the western countries the standards lay high which makes the battle for sustainable sanitation very challenging and therefor require notable examples like these. For these areas the concept is easily transferable. Specific details of the proposal, however, may require some adaptation depending on local standard and language. By starting as a mobile sanitation service we can create publicity. Though, the Phosphorus Donation can grow by the instalment of permanent public facilities. The Phosphorus campaign and its credibility would evidently benefit by this action, as would its financial situation by the stabilization of the resource collection and re-use. Legislative obstacles need to be tackled as the regaining of resources from human excreta on a commercial level is not yet allowed in all European countries.

Our Background

The Phosphorus Donation team in a nutshell 3 nationalities: French, German & Dutch 2 disciplines: Product Design & Environmental Engineering 1 goal: Create awareness about the rising Phosphorus scarcity Our team exists out of Sylvia, Michel and Anniek: Sylvia Debit was born in Roanne, France. After finishing her Bachelor Sustainable Product Design in Nîmes and Besançon in 2011 she came to Germany. Here she worked for one year as a product designer at Schedel Bad+Design in Zwickau, before she moved to Weimar to participate in the master program 'sustainable product culture' at Bauhaus-University. Here she worked together with Anniek on the implementation of Sustainable Sanitation and the idea of the Phosphorus Donation in 2013/14. Michel Riechmann, born in Espelkamp, Germany, graduated in the field of 'environmental engineering' at Bauhaus-University in Weimar in 2013. During the time of his Bachelor degree he spend half a year studying in Spain at Universidad de Salamanca in 2011/12. Later he took part in projects in Mongolia and Mexico investigating in sustainable sanitation systems. Since one year he studies the master program of 'environmental engineering' at Bauhaus-University, but lives in Leipzig and works at German Biomass Investigation Centre. Anniek Vetter, born in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, received her Bachelor’s degree in Industrial Product Design at The Hague University. During her studies she focused on sustainable design and the Cradle to Cradle method. After finishing in 2011, she worked at a small Engineer office where she designed solar collectors for the consumer market. Since 2012 she studies the Master program 'sustainable product culture' at the Bauhaus University in Weimar where she started working together with Sylvia.

Want to dig in deaper into the toilet research scene? / Published February 12, 2015 by Michel

Want to dig in deaper into the toilet research scene?

Check out iPiT on: http://ipit-news.blogspot.de
Twitter: ttps://twitter.com/iPiT_News

Greetings from the b.is (Bauhaus Institute for Infrastructure Solutions)

Team of the Phosphorus Donation, working on the final pitch

The user experience / Published November 29, 2014 by Sylvia Debit

The user experience

The user will go through 4 steps during his visit in the phosphorus donation that will give him information in an intuitive and playful manner.

The permanent and the mobile facility / Published November 29, 2014 by Sylvia Debit

The permanent and the mobile facility

The phosphorus donation can be find in a mobile version for festivals or events as well as in a permanent version in city centers.
Here you can see the mobile version.

The win-win situation of the no-mix sanitation system / Published November 29, 2014 by Sylvia Debit

The win-win situation of the no-mix sanitation system

The no-mix sanitation system does not only collect valuable resources as nutrients. It also saves water by using only 1,5 liter per flush.

Our Team

Our Mission

Modern agriculture relies on extra nutrients, especially Phosphorus, in order to secure the worlds’ food supply. In an estimated 50 years, Phosphorus supplies from mines will be at ...Read More

Our Background

The Phosphorus Donation team in a nutshell 3 nationalities: French, German & Dutch 2 disciplines: Product Design & Environmental Engineering 1 goal: Create awareness about the rising Phosphorus ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.