Misfit Produce

Misfit Produce presents "The Vigilant Veggies and the Misfortunate Fruits"

Through telling the story of the misfit fruits and vegetables, we are uniquely addressing the issue of food waste in the US.

Tags:
  • hunger
  • landfill
  • food waste
  • health
  • sustainable
  • fruits
  • food
  • food desert
  • food system
  • vegetables

Use Case

Emma Grace, a girl aged 11, has been talking nonstop about the new hilarious YouTube videos starring the awful orange, the unfortunate potato, and the awkward eggplant. Her friends and her eagerly await the weekly release of this ridiculous YouTube channel series. She can now even go with her parents to select grocery stores to buy the misshapen fruit and veggie characters from the videos, and there is talk of them being distributed to her school so they can be eaten in smoothies and as sides. It is also not long before Misfit Produce becomes a real TV Series and opens their very own grocery store, stocked full of the left out, but just as good foods.

Potential

Misfit Produce aims to make it fun and cool for youth in America to eat healthy. This will help school cafeterias be able to provide healthy food for children and combat the obesity problem in the US. Reducing food waste that goes to the landfills, means reducing methane gas, which means reducing agents that aid significantly to the greenhouse effect. Methane gas is a huge contributor to the greenhouse effect as it is an over 20 times worse greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. Also, how can we feed 9 billion people if we produce the food, but don’t distribute it where it is actually needed? We aim to combat the food desert by creatively and cost effectively distributing healthy food to areas that need it most.

Business Case

We will begin as a marketing/branding campaign that gets funding through competitions, grants, and crowd funding. We can also sell merchandise and make money via advertisements on our videos. Then we will be partnering with a grocery store or distributor to buy into our marketing and start distributing the actual produce. The next stage is to open our own store where we sell all the goods from the grocery stores we partner with, that are still good, but get thrown away. Some of these stores will be placed in areas that specifically provide healthy food for a great price to an underserved market.

Objectives:

  1. When cookie companies have been personifying foods and appealing to kids for years, it’s about time fruits and vegetables had their chance.
  2. We will reduce overall food waste by selling food that was being thrown away, which in turn gives more money to farmers.
  3. We plan to help get healthy food for a reasonable price to where it is needed most and serve areas that suffer from food deserts.

Team Misfit Produce

Raleigh, North Carolina, United States

  • Design / Art / Music
  • Food Waste / Consumer Issues
  • North America

Our Team

Resources / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Resources

Here are some of the people we have been talking with or working with. Either they have reached out to us or we reached out to them to aid us on this journey.

The Questions we Asked / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

The Questions we Asked

Questions to ask Farmers

How large is your farm? Acres/small mid or large?
What items do you farm?
Who do you distribute to?
What are the top 5 most frustrating things you face?
What is a typical day like?
What is the largest source of waste on the farm?
What percentage of total produce is not sold at regular price?
What percentage of total produce is not sold at regular price due to cosmetic reasons alone (not including rotten/or about to go bad, only the small or deformed ones)?
What do you do with the produce that is not cosmetic?
What do you do with the produce that is going bad soon?
Do you harvest all produce even if you don’t think it will sell/or will have to be sold at a discount?
Do you have any other contacts with farmers, distributors, or grocery stores I could talk to?

Questions to ask Grocery Stores

What is the main reason items get thrown away?
What item(s) get(s) thrown away the most?
What percentage of the total inventory gets thrown away?
What percentage of this is arguably still good?
What percentage of produce (fruits and vegetables) gets thrown away?
Does it all get thrown away? If not where does it go?
Does the store have to pay for weight or volume of trash to be taken to the landfill? or is it a set fee? or do you do it yourself?
Do you have any connections with other grocery stores, farmers, or distributors I could talk to?

Questions for Distributors

What fruits and vegetables do you distribute?
What farms do you work with?
What buyers do you work with?
What are your top 5 frustrations about distributing produce?
What is a typical day like?
What percentage of product ends up not being distributed?
What are the most common reasons it can’t be distributed?
What percentage if any is not distributed because of cosmetic reasons?
Is the non-distributed produce thrown away or is something else done with it?
What is used to store the produce?
Can I get the information of the farmers to ask them some questions? Or can I send you the questions to ask them?

Storyboard2 / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Storyboard2

Storyboard1 / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Storyboard1

Food Waste Infographics / Published December 1, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Food Waste Infographics

Our Mission

Misfit Produce presenting the Vigilant Veggies and the Misfortunate Fruits aims to address the pressing issue of food waste in United States through a unique approach: telling the story of the ugly (not rotten) perfectly tasty fruits and vegetables that never make it to the grocery store shelves. Through these lighthearted promotional videos, Misfit Produce plans to provide healthy food to an underserved market, reduce overall food waste, and make it fun for America’s youth to eat healthy. We plan to do this by using our creativity to create fun stories about the inglorious fruits and vegetables, blast social media, make a KickStarter campaign and partner with a grocery store or distributor to get the just as good, but currently neglected foods where they are needed most.

Our Background

We are all talented individuals who are bound together by our passion to make a difference. We care about the world, its inhabitants, and our futures. We want to take on the big problems with simple solutions. We heard about the Thought for Food Challenge just two days before the deadline to apply and spent Halloween rushing to complete the application. Thankfully we just made it and have been working hard the last month to get Misfit Produce to take form and become a viable solution to the enormous challenge of feeding 9 billion people by 2050. We have spent this month becoming experts on food systems in the US, talking with farmers, distributors, grocery stores, and gleaners, talking with consumers and gaging their interest in food waste, buying cheaper healthy food, and eating ugly vegetables. We sent out surveys over email and facebook, we talk to people in person, and we networked with organizations who had already asked similar questions and gained their valuable insights. We figured out a step by step plan and we are just now beginning to execute on the plan. Misfit Produce aims to make it fun and cool for youth in America to eat healthy. When cookie companies have been personifying foods and appealing to kids for years, it’s about time fruits and vegetables had their chance. This will help school cafeterias be able to provide healthy food for children and combat the obesity problem in the US. We will also be reducing overall food waste by selling food that was being thrown away, which in turn gives more money to farmers. Reducing food waste that goes to the landfills also means reducing methane gas. Methane gas adds significantly to the greenhouse effect, because it is an over 20 times worse greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. Another objective of Misfit Produce is to help get healthy food for a reasonable price to where it is needed most, serving the areas that suffer from food deserts. We plan to do this by opening a grocery store in the food desert regions that sells healthy food for a discount. It will be able to do this because it will buy for cheap the food that is being thrown away by other grocery stores. Along with this the Misfit Produce Grocery store will have a delivery program where food can be ordered online and delivered to your house weekly for an extra delivery charge. Thought for Food Challenge is an integral step in this process. It encouraged us to get the ball rolling, it provided a community of people all working on solving the same problem, and gave us an incredible step by step design process to aid us in our development. We hope we can continue in the Thought for Food Challenge journey, and we thank you for all the amazing things you have already done!

Resources / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Resources

Here are some of the people we have been talking with or working with. Either they have reached out to us or we reached out to them to aid us on this journey.

The Questions we Asked / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

The Questions we Asked

Questions to ask Farmers

How large is your farm? Acres/small mid or large?
What items do you farm?
Who do you distribute to?
What are the top 5 most frustrating things you face?
What is a typical day like?
What is the largest source of waste on the farm?
What percentage of total produce is not sold at regular price?
What percentage of total produce is not sold at regular price due to cosmetic reasons alone (not including rotten/or about to go bad, only the small or deformed ones)?
What do you do with the produce that is not cosmetic?
What do you do with the produce that is going bad soon?
Do you harvest all produce even if you don’t think it will sell/or will have to be sold at a discount?
Do you have any other contacts with farmers, distributors, or grocery stores I could talk to?

Questions to ask Grocery Stores

What is the main reason items get thrown away?
What item(s) get(s) thrown away the most?
What percentage of the total inventory gets thrown away?
What percentage of this is arguably still good?
What percentage of produce (fruits and vegetables) gets thrown away?
Does it all get thrown away? If not where does it go?
Does the store have to pay for weight or volume of trash to be taken to the landfill? or is it a set fee? or do you do it yourself?
Do you have any connections with other grocery stores, farmers, or distributors I could talk to?

Questions for Distributors

What fruits and vegetables do you distribute?
What farms do you work with?
What buyers do you work with?
What are your top 5 frustrations about distributing produce?
What is a typical day like?
What percentage of product ends up not being distributed?
What are the most common reasons it can’t be distributed?
What percentage if any is not distributed because of cosmetic reasons?
Is the non-distributed produce thrown away or is something else done with it?
What is used to store the produce?
Can I get the information of the farmers to ask them some questions? Or can I send you the questions to ask them?

Storyboard2 / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Storyboard2

Storyboard1 / Published December 7, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Storyboard1

Food Waste Infographics / Published December 1, 2014 by Tia Simpson

Food Waste Infographics

Our Team

Our Mission

Misfit Produce presenting the Vigilant Veggies and the Misfortunate Fruits aims to address the pressing issue of food waste in United States through a unique approach: telling the ...Read More

Our Background

We are all talented individuals who are bound together by our passion to make a difference. We care about the world, its inhabitants, and our futures. We want ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.