Food for Farmworkers

Bridging the gap between food waste and food insecurity.

Food for Farmworkers sells surplus produce at below market price to food insecure farmworker communities via a mobile market operation.

Use Case

Food for Farmworkers challenges the economic and locational barriers that typically prevent agricultural food desert communities from accessing healthy food. Farmworkers and their families will use the service because it will provide low priced produce to their community. Many farmworkers lack transportation and therefore cannot access distant grocery stores. The mobile market system will deliver produce directly to at risk communities and address the problem of food insecurity at its root.

Potential

Food waste is a massive global problem caused by inefficiencies in various levels of the food supply chain. Reducing waste decreases hunger and promotes environmental sustainability. Meanwhile, farmworker communities face exorbitantly high rates of food insecurity, overweight and obesity. Though separate models of mobile markets and produce “gleaning” have been implemented in various communities, no existing system addresses both problems synergistically. Food for Farmworkers simultaneously reduces food waste, thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions, feeds farmworkers and their families healthy food, and compensates farmers for their surplus produce.

Business Case

Our organization will operate as a hybrid nonprofit model with a mandatory fee and voluntary donation. 100% of the revenue stream will be used towards operations of the program. We plan to purchase the surplus produce at below market price directly from farmers, and then charge customers a slightly increased price to account for the overhead. Additionally, we will generate revenue from fundraisers outside of the target community that will account for extra costs, projects, and expansion. This resembles a more sustainable model compared to a food bank, which is intended to offer emergency hunger relief and is not a long-term source of food. For this approach, we will need to interview a representative sample of farmworkers in order to appropriately price the produce.

Objectives:

  1. Increase access to healthy food in food insecure farmworker communities.
  2. Engage, educate, and empower the community to promote healthy eating.
  3. Prevent organic matter from going to landfill in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Team Food for Farmworkers

Providence, Rhode Island , United States of America

Our Team

Draft Project Proposal (includes budget and start-up timeline) / Published January 10, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Draft Project Proposal (includes budget and start-up timeline)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwFlLezvvCJgXzdxSjRMenFLUm8/view?usp=sharing

This document expands upon the information on our page. It includes a more detailed use case, business case, and potential. It also contains a rough budget and timeline for a possible 10 week start-up period.

Appendices (corresponds with Research Report) / Published January 10, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Appendices (corresponds with Research Report)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwFlLezvvCJgR3ZvQUp6YWlieGc/view?usp=sharing

This document includes charts and graphs to supplement the research presented in the report.

Research Report / Published January 10, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Research Report

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwFlLezvvCJgMDFmYnl1blEwNU0/view?usp=sharing

Our team carried out extensive research to assess the need of our project and to decide the most effective means of addressing the problem. This report outlines the results of both bottom-up and top-down research.

Found a very informative journal article supporting our concept

http://www.cirsinc.org/rural-california-report/entry/food-insecurity-among-farm-workers-in-the-salinas-valley-california

The statistics of food insecurity and overweight and obesity among farmworkers in Salinas Valley outlined in this paper are staggering! We must work to divert food waste to improve access to healthy food in farmworker communities!

Phone call day today! / Published January 6, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Phone call day today!

Spoke with Jacobs Farm, Imperfect Produce, and Clinica de Salud del Valle de Salinas this afternoon. They offered great guidance and were very enthusiastic about our idea! We are looking forward to collaborating and establishing official partnerships to bridge the gap between food waste and food insecurity!

Our Mission

Food insecurity is a massive global issue caused by efficiency, distribution, and waste problems. Enough food is produced each year to feed the entire global population, yet in many migrant and seasonal farmworker communities, up to 82% of individuals are food insecure. Farmworkers and their families are especially susceptible to malnutrition and degenerative diseases such as obesity due to lack of access to fresh produce and healthy food options. Additionally, about 10% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions result from producing, transporting, storing, and preparing food that is never consumed. Our goal is to address these overlapping issues by facilitating a system in which otherwise wasted produce is distributed to workers and their families.

Our Background

As students pursuing studies in Public Health and Environmental Studies at Brown University, we are enthusiastic about the potential to address two widespread injustices: food waste and food insecurity. Our team looks forward to collaborating with farmworkers, farmers, non-governmental organizations, and policy-makers to establish a partnership which improves the health of both farmworkers and the Earth. We are passionate social justice and environmental activists, working closely with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, Food Recovery Network, and the Brown Market Shares Program to promote corporate social responsibility, human rights, and sustainability.

Draft Project Proposal (includes budget and start-up timeline) / Published January 10, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Draft Project Proposal (includes budget and start-up timeline)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwFlLezvvCJgXzdxSjRMenFLUm8/view?usp=sharing

This document expands upon the information on our page. It includes a more detailed use case, business case, and potential. It also contains a rough budget and timeline for a possible 10 week start-up period.

Appendices (corresponds with Research Report) / Published January 10, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Appendices (corresponds with Research Report)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwFlLezvvCJgR3ZvQUp6YWlieGc/view?usp=sharing

This document includes charts and graphs to supplement the research presented in the report.

Research Report / Published January 10, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Research Report

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwFlLezvvCJgMDFmYnl1blEwNU0/view?usp=sharing

Our team carried out extensive research to assess the need of our project and to decide the most effective means of addressing the problem. This report outlines the results of both bottom-up and top-down research.

Found a very informative journal article supporting our concept

http://www.cirsinc.org/rural-california-report/entry/food-insecurity-among-farm-workers-in-the-salinas-valley-california

The statistics of food insecurity and overweight and obesity among farmworkers in Salinas Valley outlined in this paper are staggering! We must work to divert food waste to improve access to healthy food in farmworker communities!

Phone call day today! / Published January 6, 2016 by Lauren Maunus

Phone call day today!

Spoke with Jacobs Farm, Imperfect Produce, and Clinica de Salud del Valle de Salinas this afternoon. They offered great guidance and were very enthusiastic about our idea! We are looking forward to collaborating and establishing official partnerships to bridge the gap between food waste and food insecurity!

Our Team

Our Mission

Food insecurity is a massive global issue caused by efficiency, distribution, and waste problems. Enough food is produced each year to feed the entire global population, yet in ...Read More

Our Background

As students pursuing studies in Public Health and Environmental Studies at Brown University, we are enthusiastic about the potential to address two widespread injustices: food waste and food ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.