Grain Check

T.H.A.L.I- Think Hunger Act Locally and Immediately

Save grains. Feed billions. Eco friendly, zero energy, inexpensive storage units at farmer level, by use of Local materials & technologies.

Use Case

Rajan of Tiruppur cultivates millets & pulses in 5 acres. He owns 10 cows. The dilapidated room in which he stores his grains is unable to prevent loss of 600 kg a year to rodents, pests, diseases, heat & rain, which could have fed his family of 4 for 3 years. Grain Check team helps build a storage structure which uses Mitti Cool Technology that needs just water and clay for cooling, recycled plastic bottles for stability and a cow dung herbal paste plaster for prevention of pests & diseases. Rajan has tons of cow dung produced in the farm. He also has easy access to used plastic bottles that are otherwise dumped in the nearby city, messing up landfills. He now saves enough grains to feed his family for 3 years effortlessly. Suraj in Haryana who cultivates rice & wheat can do the same.

Potential

We, at the Grain check team, have taken a rather simplistic route with the driving mantra, “A grain saved, is a grain produced”. Our solution is an attempt towards saving enough grains for feeding 312 Million people for 1 year in India with zero incremental investment for its production. Our focus on saving 15.6 million M.T. of grains lost at present during storage at the farmer level follows the T.H.A.L.I. approach, Think Hunger Act Locally and Immediately. Our solution is an inexpensive, efficient storage structure at the farmer level, integrating eco friendly, zero energy, grass roots technologies that utilize locally available materials and recycled plastic bottles. It encourages local consumption and enhances food security.

Business Case

We look at a Win-Win deal for farmers and Grain Check while addressing world hunger. For constructing the Grain Check units we would start by identifying farmers having poor storage facility. Thereafter, the award money received will be used as seed money for constructing pilot units to demonstrate the efficacy of grain check unit, in the first year. Depending upon the cost of each pilot unit and the total money received, the number of pilot projects in diverse locations will be determined. This will be followed by commercial installation for farmers from the year after, the size of which will depend upon on the farmer’s requirements. Fixed percentage of the installation amount will be Grain check’s profit.

Objectives:

  1. To offer a viable option to the farmer to store grains safely, thereby encouraging local consumption & enhancing food security.
  2. To facilitate decentralization of food grain storage, thereby reducing the carbon footprint drastically.
  3. To contribute towards economic well being of small farmers simply by eliminating wastage.

Team Grain Check

New Delhi, India

Our Team

Global Statistics on Plastic Bottles / Published January 10, 2016 by Ipshita Das

Global Statistics on Plastic Bottles

A snapshot / Published January 10, 2016 by Ipshita Das

A snapshot

Grain Check Model: Elucidated / Published January 9, 2016 by Sheetal Srinivasamurthy

Grain Check Model: Elucidated

https://youtu.be/hmCaEaYvhf0

Here's Vismita explaining the entire model of Grain Check unit :)

Herbal paste - Going 'GREEN' against insects. / Published January 9, 2016 by Vismita Rustagi

Herbal paste - Going 'GREEN' against insects.

Food grain losses due to insect infestation during storage is a serious problem, particularly in the developing countries. Losses caused by insects include not only the direct consumption of kernels, but also accumulation of webbing, and cadavers. High levels of the insect detritus may result in grain that is unfit for human consumption and loss of the food commodities, both, in terms of quality and quantity.

Synthetic insecticides have been used extensively in grain facilities to control stored product insect pests. Although chemical insecticides are effective, their repeated use has led to residual toxicity, environmental pollution and an adverse effect on food besides side effect on humans.
Their uninterrupted and indiscriminate use not only has led to the development of resistant strains but also accumulation of toxic residues on food grains used for human consumption that has led to the health hazards.

Therefore to prevent the wastage of food grains in an eco-friendly manner, team Grain Check has decided to use a “Herbal paste” of plant and animal derivatives which are more readily biodegradable and less likely to contaminate the environment.

The most well-known example is the Indian Neem plant (Azadirachta indica). It's various parts, namely, leaves, crushed seeds, powdered fruits, oil, and so forth, have been used to protect stored grains from infestation. The Neem oil and kernel powder give effective grain protection as it repels insect pests like Sitophilus oryzae, Tribolium cataneum, Rhyzopertha dominica, and Callosobruchus chinensis at the rate of 1 to 2% kernel powder or oil . Eighteen species of Neem plant offered protection to wheat up to 9 months without affecting seed germination.

Turmeric, garlic, Vitex negundo, gliricidia, castor, Aristolochia, ginger, Agave americana, custard apple, Datura, Calotropis, Ipomoea, and coriander are some of the other widely used botanicals to control and repel crop pests .

Business Canvas Model / Published January 8, 2016 by Vismita Rustagi

Business Canvas Model

Our Mission

The driving mantra of our team is: “A grain saved, is a grain produced”. This thought has propelled our minds and thus our team has come up with a plan to address the lack of adequate storage system in our country leading to huge food grain loss every year at the farmer level. Our concept focuses on providing an efficient storage structure to the farmers which will cost a minuscule fragment of installation and running costs of a modern storage unit.

Our Background

We are three young enthusiasts working towards a common goal. Ipshita is pursuing her Masters degree in Sustainable Development Practice and Sheetal and Vismita are pursuing their B.tech in Food Technology. We together are doing our bit to reduce food storage problem across the globe starting our journey from India.

Global Statistics on Plastic Bottles / Published January 10, 2016 by Ipshita Das

Global Statistics on Plastic Bottles

A snapshot / Published January 10, 2016 by Ipshita Das

A snapshot

Grain Check Model: Elucidated / Published January 9, 2016 by Sheetal Srinivasamurthy

Grain Check Model: Elucidated

https://youtu.be/hmCaEaYvhf0

Here's Vismita explaining the entire model of Grain Check unit :)

Herbal paste - Going 'GREEN' against insects. / Published January 9, 2016 by Vismita Rustagi

Herbal paste - Going 'GREEN' against insects.

Food grain losses due to insect infestation during storage is a serious problem, particularly in the developing countries. Losses caused by insects include not only the direct consumption of kernels, but also accumulation of webbing, and cadavers. High levels of the insect detritus may result in grain that is unfit for human consumption and loss of the food commodities, both, in terms of quality and quantity.

Synthetic insecticides have been used extensively in grain facilities to control stored product insect pests. Although chemical insecticides are effective, their repeated use has led to residual toxicity, environmental pollution and an adverse effect on food besides side effect on humans.
Their uninterrupted and indiscriminate use not only has led to the development of resistant strains but also accumulation of toxic residues on food grains used for human consumption that has led to the health hazards.

Therefore to prevent the wastage of food grains in an eco-friendly manner, team Grain Check has decided to use a “Herbal paste” of plant and animal derivatives which are more readily biodegradable and less likely to contaminate the environment.

The most well-known example is the Indian Neem plant (Azadirachta indica). It's various parts, namely, leaves, crushed seeds, powdered fruits, oil, and so forth, have been used to protect stored grains from infestation. The Neem oil and kernel powder give effective grain protection as it repels insect pests like Sitophilus oryzae, Tribolium cataneum, Rhyzopertha dominica, and Callosobruchus chinensis at the rate of 1 to 2% kernel powder or oil . Eighteen species of Neem plant offered protection to wheat up to 9 months without affecting seed germination.

Turmeric, garlic, Vitex negundo, gliricidia, castor, Aristolochia, ginger, Agave americana, custard apple, Datura, Calotropis, Ipomoea, and coriander are some of the other widely used botanicals to control and repel crop pests .

Business Canvas Model / Published January 8, 2016 by Vismita Rustagi

Business Canvas Model

Our Team

Our Mission

The driving mantra of our team is: “A grain saved, is a grain produced”. This thought has propelled our minds and thus our team has come up with ...Read More

Our Background

We are three young enthusiasts working towards a common goal. Ipshita is pursuing her Masters degree in Sustainable Development Practice and Sheetal and Vismita are pursuing their B.tech ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.