The Pocket Change

Buy good, eat better, the best way to encourage sustainable consumption.

This app incentives both stores and customers to better manage their food waste by creating a sustainable ecosystem.

Use Case

For the supermarkets the app encourages efficient sale of fast perishable food, optimizing their inventory management and sales. For the customers the app delivers tangible benefits for reducing carbon footprint. Thanks to the app the customer is constantly updated with upcoming special promotions on food about to perish. Stores cut down their food waste by selling food that was otherwise going to pass the expiration date. The app also tracks the purchases to help the user manage his food inventory by sending notices after buying fresh food products. These notices include recipes to encourage that food ends up as healthy and delicious meals and not waste.

Potential

Among the various problems which we face along the food supply chain, food wastage is one of the most global concerns. According to an FAO study, each year in the world 1,3 Bn tons of food is wasted. This represents one third of the global production. A massive part of these losses occur on stores’ shelves, while up to 30% of the food in our homes is not eaten and ends in the trashcan. In the US, 40% of the food produced goes to waste. Here is what could be saved in this country only (NRDC 2015): • 25% of all freshwater used in U.S. • 4% total U.S. oil consumption • $165 Bn per year (more than $40 billion from households) • $750 Mn per year just to dispose of the food • 33 Mn tons of landfill waste (leading to greenhouse gas emissions)

Business Case

Value Proposition: • For the stores: Make profits on products going to get spoiled, attract new customers and gain loyalty and improve its reputation. • For the customer: Saves money thanks to the special offers and loyalty rewards. Value architecture: The app makes the link between the local partner stores and the customer. The organisation can be easily automated for the data of the purchase or the status of the stores’ inventory to be exploited. Profit equation: • Free for the customer • The stores pay a subscription to access the platform settled by a third-party company. This company will have to monitor the ecological and social impacts of the project.

Objectives:

  1. Reduce stores food waste (5 to 7 tons/stores/year)
  2. Reduce household food waste (10 to 20 kg/user/year)
  3. Trigger responsible food consumption behaviours

Team the POCKET RANGERS

Jouy en Josas, France

Our Team

Brain food / Published January 10, 2016 by Philip Lonsdale

Brain food

We did a lot of our brain storming during shared meals, and while walking back and forth between campus and the local supermarket. Eventually, these trips became field research!
During our reflections on the challenge, we came to the conclusion that because of their immense bargaining power relative to the other players in the industry, supermarkets have the most capacity to improve the efficiency of our food distribution. Love them or hate them, supermarkets are here to stay - we want to make the best of them!

POCKET RANGERS / Published January 9, 2016 by Benjamin Chevalier

POCKET RANGERS

The pocket rangers - a complementary team with various background but one common objective: End food wastage!

Pocket Change - first concept (November 2015) / Published January 9, 2016 by Benjamin Chevalier

Pocket Change - first concept (November 2015)

https://youtu.be/tEc-Zs3Y74w

Here is the video of first concept we created. We produced this video to receive feedbacks from TFF staffs or TFF former participants. Then we improved our concept by simplifying the pocket change and focusing on the waste issue. You can play the game of finding the differences between this first draft and the final pitch ;)

Tristram Stuart on Waste / Published January 6, 2016 by Philip Lonsdale

Tristram Stuart on Waste

https://www.ted.com/talks/tristram_stuart_the_global_food_waste_scandal?language=en

According to Tristram Stuart's landmark 2009 book "Waste" some farmers have been able to double their incomes by choosing to sell produce that they had been previously been throwing out... could supermarkets see similar results?

A well deserved apple / Published January 5, 2016 by Philip Lonsdale

A well deserved apple

After a day of hard work, Ben couldn't even wait til we were out of the store to have a bite of a delicious apple!

Our Mission

The team was formed after a presentation of the TFF Challenge on our campus, even if we didn't know each other very well, we decided to team up to make a difference on this issue we felt all concerned with. Thinking of the global food issue, our researches lead to the discovery of the massive amounts of food wasted each year worldwide. We decided to join our efforts to propose a pragmatic and new way to tackle this issue.

Our Background

We are the Pocket Rangers: 5 students from the Master of Sustainability and Social Innovation at HEC Paris: this Master is all about creating new business models to fight climate change and foster social progress. We come from 4 different countries in 3 different continents. Each of us has experience in very different areas and is really motiated to design creative solutions to today's issues. Phil - from US - organized a community garden in San Francisco, part-time cook at a restaurant in Paris. Aude - from France – worked at the French Ministry of Economy and volunteered in India in the education sector. Michele - from Italy - environmental engineering background with a focus on solid waste management and air pollution control. Shrikar - from India - worked in renewable energy sector and prior to that sailed as an engineer on Shell LNG Tankers. Ben - from France - has an engineering background and worked on urban planning in France and in Asia.

Brain food / Published January 10, 2016 by Philip Lonsdale

Brain food

We did a lot of our brain storming during shared meals, and while walking back and forth between campus and the local supermarket. Eventually, these trips became field research!
During our reflections on the challenge, we came to the conclusion that because of their immense bargaining power relative to the other players in the industry, supermarkets have the most capacity to improve the efficiency of our food distribution. Love them or hate them, supermarkets are here to stay - we want to make the best of them!

POCKET RANGERS / Published January 9, 2016 by Benjamin Chevalier

POCKET RANGERS

The pocket rangers - a complementary team with various background but one common objective: End food wastage!

Pocket Change - first concept (November 2015) / Published January 9, 2016 by Benjamin Chevalier

Pocket Change - first concept (November 2015)

https://youtu.be/tEc-Zs3Y74w

Here is the video of first concept we created. We produced this video to receive feedbacks from TFF staffs or TFF former participants. Then we improved our concept by simplifying the pocket change and focusing on the waste issue. You can play the game of finding the differences between this first draft and the final pitch ;)

Tristram Stuart on Waste / Published January 6, 2016 by Philip Lonsdale

Tristram Stuart on Waste

https://www.ted.com/talks/tristram_stuart_the_global_food_waste_scandal?language=en

According to Tristram Stuart's landmark 2009 book "Waste" some farmers have been able to double their incomes by choosing to sell produce that they had been previously been throwing out... could supermarkets see similar results?

A well deserved apple / Published January 5, 2016 by Philip Lonsdale

A well deserved apple

After a day of hard work, Ben couldn't even wait til we were out of the store to have a bite of a delicious apple!

Our Team

Our Mission

The team was formed after a presentation of the TFF Challenge on our campus, even if we didn't know each other very well, we decided to team up ...Read More

Our Background

We are the Pocket Rangers: 5 students from the Master of Sustainability and Social Innovation at HEC Paris: this Master is all about creating new business models to ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.