Biteback Insect Mineral Oil

Biting back insect for sustainable future!

Biteback Insect Mineral Oil: Providing a nutritious and sustainable cooking oil which is effectively enhance nutrition in processed food.

Use Case

Biteback oil is intended to be used as cooking oil for people who are concern with nutritional value and green product. It can be used for various cooking processes. Biteback oil gives the consumer access to sustainable cooking oil and also choices to their dietary option but keep their daily mineral need fulfilled. Mineral is easily dissolved when heated, so can significantly improving nutrition in food that processed with biteback oil. Another application is for green companies which are committed to the environment. The companies could use biteback oil as their product’s ingredient instead of palm oil and contribute to preventing deforestation in Indonesia. The crude form of extracted insect oil can be used as biodiesel material rather than plant oil that can affecting food insecurity.

Potential

Biteback insect mineral oil is an idea that can prevent iron deficiency anemia. Biteback oil is a superior product that is substantial in food processing. It is a cooking oil made of mealworm which have wide variety of vitamins and minerals especially iron. Biteback oil can be an alternative solution for sustainable cooking oil. The production of palm oil is around 4 tons/hectare per year and responsible for massive deforestation in Indonesia. On the same area, insects can be produced at least 150 tons/year. The cultivation of mealworm is cheap and can be farmed indoor. Cooking oils and fats market is expected to reach USD 65 Billion by 2021. Biteback will stand out due to its sustainability and nutrition. Not to mention 2.1 billion people who are already adopting insect in their diet.

Business Case

Biteback insect mineral oil is a nutritious and sustainable cooking oil which is significantly improving the nutrition of processed food. It can be an alternative for available cooking oil which is lack of nutrition and required a lot of resource. Biteback oil targeted to people who are concern with nutritional value and the green consumer which is increasing as high as middle-class society in Indonesia. Biteback oil will available in retailer and online store. Biteback will be operating as an insect farming industry and also as manufacturer. As the market continue to grow we’ll targeting industrial market to using biteback oil as its product ingredient. Furthermore, the company’s high demand for insect will create entrepreneurship opportunity for small scale insect farming in Indonesia.

Objectives:

  1. Reduce and preventing iron deficiency anemia by providing superior product that can significantly increase nutrition in food.
  2. Develop edible insects as sustainable resources to replace palm oil consumption which is responsible for massive deforestation in Indonesia.
  3. Expand edible insect commodity market and enable entrepreneurship opportunity through low investment farming industry.

Team Biteback

Malang, Indonesia

Our Team

Global Foodies! From rainforest to your cupboard: the real story of palm oil

http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/ng-interactive/2014/nov/10/palm-oil-rainforest-cupboard-interactive

Check this very interactive article from The Guardian regarding the journey of palm oil from rainforest to our cupboard. Surprisingly, up to 50% of the products that we buy contain palm oil, from processed food, shampoo, soap, to cosmetics. As the population continue to grow the demand of palm oil also keep increasing. This lead to a lot more rainforest conversed to palm oil plantation. In Indonesia, forest fires are still remain the most efficient tool to do so if we look at the cost when hard machine and labor involved even though it is not legal. Thus, we need to find sustainable solution to replace palm oil consumption as soon as possible.

Fatty Acids Content In Mealworm / Published January 10, 2016 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Fatty Acids Content In Mealworm

Insight + Insight + Insight / Published January 7, 2016 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Insight + Insight + Insight

Expert Input / Published January 5, 2016 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Expert Input

“This product is an alternative solution for sustainable cooking oil. As we know available cooking oil in Indonesia like Palm oil is lack of nutrient and also cause environmental damage. Edible insects are already known of its essential minerals that could tackle mineral deficiency in Indonesia. The high contain of Polyunsaturated Fatty acids make this product suitable for our oil consumption. Even though the vitamin and mineral are easily dissolved when heated but eventually will be lost if used in really high temperature like deep frying. So to get the nutrient benefit from the product use it for low temperature cooking like we use olive oil.”
Dr. Ir. Nur Hidayat, MP.
Lecturer of Agroindustrial Technology, Agricultural Technology Faculty University of Brawijaya

Media Partner / Published December 10, 2015 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Media Partner

http://glowforindonesia.org/inspiring-indonesia/read/insect-mineral-oil-could-this-be-the-future-of-food/91

We are excited to tell you that our team now is collaborating with Glow For Indonesia as media partner and has been featured in Inspiring Indonesia project. Glow For Indonesia is a social community that is driven by young people, which aims to provide a positive impact for Indonesia. There are seven projects that are currently being executed: Lele Food, Parahyangan Green Challenge, Sharing with You, Gloria Morgen, Inspiring Indonesia, Ruang Cerita, De Expor. As the team keep progressing we hope another posts regarding BITEBACK will show up.

Hereby attached link of the article about BITEBACK written by TFF Global Ambassador for Indonesia Ratih Nawangwulan. Happy Reading :)

Our Mission

30% of the world's population are having anaemia, mostly due to iron deficiency. According to WHO, Iron deficiency is the most common malnutrition issue in developing countries and also the only nutrient deficiency that significantly prevalent in industrialized countries. Biteback comes with idea by using edible insects as ingredient of cooking oil. Edible insects are undeniably rich sources of protein, vitamin, and minerals such iron and zinc. They also contain fat acid that potentially used as cooking oil. Cooking oil is the most consumed food ingredient in daily basis, it's predicted by 2020 cooking oil consumption will reach 232.4 million ton worldwide. Unfortunately, land clearing of palm oil for cooking oil production in Indonesia is responsible for majority deforestation cause in the country. Our team strongly believe by using insect based cooking oil as iron resource will effectively tackle the problem and provide sustainable solution for cooking oil industry.

Our Background

Biteback is derived from the common idea in society that insect is pest that biting people, crop, and its present is a disadvantage. Lack of understanding and consumer acceptance led to underdevelopment of insect based product. It's a challenge for us to create new breakthrough to embrace people to think insect as nutritious and sustainable food resources. That's "Biteback". Despite of get bitten by insect, we are the ones who do the bite. Biteback consists of 4 students from Department of Agroindustrial Technology University of Brawijaya with different program studies specialized in Food Industry, Agroindustrial System and Technology, and Agroforestry with experiences in research and product development.

Global Foodies! From rainforest to your cupboard: the real story of palm oil

http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/ng-interactive/2014/nov/10/palm-oil-rainforest-cupboard-interactive

Check this very interactive article from The Guardian regarding the journey of palm oil from rainforest to our cupboard. Surprisingly, up to 50% of the products that we buy contain palm oil, from processed food, shampoo, soap, to cosmetics. As the population continue to grow the demand of palm oil also keep increasing. This lead to a lot more rainforest conversed to palm oil plantation. In Indonesia, forest fires are still remain the most efficient tool to do so if we look at the cost when hard machine and labor involved even though it is not legal. Thus, we need to find sustainable solution to replace palm oil consumption as soon as possible.

Fatty Acids Content In Mealworm / Published January 10, 2016 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Fatty Acids Content In Mealworm

Insight + Insight + Insight / Published January 7, 2016 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Insight + Insight + Insight

Expert Input / Published January 5, 2016 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Expert Input

“This product is an alternative solution for sustainable cooking oil. As we know available cooking oil in Indonesia like Palm oil is lack of nutrient and also cause environmental damage. Edible insects are already known of its essential minerals that could tackle mineral deficiency in Indonesia. The high contain of Polyunsaturated Fatty acids make this product suitable for our oil consumption. Even though the vitamin and mineral are easily dissolved when heated but eventually will be lost if used in really high temperature like deep frying. So to get the nutrient benefit from the product use it for low temperature cooking like we use olive oil.”
Dr. Ir. Nur Hidayat, MP.
Lecturer of Agroindustrial Technology, Agricultural Technology Faculty University of Brawijaya

Media Partner / Published December 10, 2015 by Mush'ab Eddy Nursantio

Media Partner

http://glowforindonesia.org/inspiring-indonesia/read/insect-mineral-oil-could-this-be-the-future-of-food/91

We are excited to tell you that our team now is collaborating with Glow For Indonesia as media partner and has been featured in Inspiring Indonesia project. Glow For Indonesia is a social community that is driven by young people, which aims to provide a positive impact for Indonesia. There are seven projects that are currently being executed: Lele Food, Parahyangan Green Challenge, Sharing with You, Gloria Morgen, Inspiring Indonesia, Ruang Cerita, De Expor. As the team keep progressing we hope another posts regarding BITEBACK will show up.

Hereby attached link of the article about BITEBACK written by TFF Global Ambassador for Indonesia Ratih Nawangwulan. Happy Reading :)

Our Team

Our Mission

30% of the world's population are having anaemia, mostly due to iron deficiency. According to WHO, Iron deficiency is the most common malnutrition issue in developing countries and ...Read More

Our Background

Biteback is derived from the common idea in society that insect is pest that biting people, crop, and its present is a disadvantage. Lack of understanding and consumer ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.