HACHIBUNME Project

Eating “just enough” reduces food wastes and saves starving children.

HACHIBUNME menu (80% volume) allows restaurants to donate 20% and customers to eat without leftover and become prosocial for food issues.

Use Case

People tend to order/eat too much. In FJFA (Fuqua Japan Food Association) certified restaurants, customers can order HACHIBUNME (80% volume) menu, so they can eat “just enough,” reducing leftovers. Customers are charged the same price as the regular size, while prosocial customers are willing to accept it because they know the saved material costs will be donated to eradicate food poverty. After just finish eating, restaurants’ trained staffs come to teach customers about food shortage issue by using a monthly report written by FJFA. It’s the best timing to increase awareness and make customers take actions like donations. Also, this system helps reduce obesity and become healthier. Overall, this system solves food shortage by reducing food wastes as well as increases awareness.

Potential

The annual amount of Japan’s food waste from enterprise is 4 million ton, equivalent to the annual amount of food aid in the world. In Japan, over half million restaurants make leftover every day. Though they are wealthy and prosocial, Japanese middle class don’t recognize what happens now to starving children. By giving them chances to do something at proper moments, they will corporate. It’s totally win-win. Leftover decreases, people get healthier, and more food goes to starving children. According to our initial contact, a couple of restaurants are already interested in supporting further trials to prove this concept. If cutting edge restaurants participate in HACHIBUNME project, it will be a mega trend like LOHAS. In future, we will prevail this concept in other developed countries.

Business Case

FJFA is an NPO which certifies restaurants based on due diligence. FJFA provides marketing and operational supports so that restaurants can easily set-up necessary operations. FJFA receives certification fee in return. FJFA-certified restaurants can promote their CSRs and attract more customers. These restaurants can offer HACHIBUNME menu, adjusted to 80 percent of the original amount to minimize food wastes. Customers are charged the same money as the original ones, and restaurants donate their savings (20% of material costs) to FJFA. After the meal, customers receive monthly reports to learn about food issues and have the chance to donate to restaurants. FJFA uses this donation, restaurants’ savings, and certification fee to save starving children.

Objectives:

  1. Reduce food waste: Restaurants can offer appropriate amount of food to customers by HACHIBUNME menu
  2. Aid for starving children: Restaurants and customers can give money donations to address food scarcity issues
  3. Encourage customers to become healthier: Customers can reduce unnecessary food intake by ordering appropriate amount of food

Team Fuqua Japan Food Association

Chapel Hill, United States of America

Our Team

1227 / Published December 27, 2016 by Shimpei Ikeno

1227

Endless meeting

Our Mission

Find a way to leverage Japanese tech know-how, experience, and people to solve food crises.

Our Background

We are MBA students at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. We are participating in this challenge because some of our team members work for the central bank for Japan's agricultural, fisheries, and forestry industries so that we are very concerned about the future of agriculture. Through this challenge, we want to contribute to finding a solution to current and future food crises.

1227 / Published December 27, 2016 by Shimpei Ikeno

1227

Endless meeting

Our Team

Our Mission

Find a way to leverage Japanese tech know-how, experience, and people to solve food crises.Read More

Our Background

We are MBA students at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. We are participating in this challenge because some of our team members work for the central bank ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.