EKAYU

Fortify your Food!

Converting fruit waste into high dietary fiber powder and incorporating it in staple food to increase its nutritional value and shelf life

Use Case

Dietary Fiber is the second most deficient Macro-nutrient. Ekayu High Fiber powder can be used by people of all Dietary habits. From people with the fast paced life of urbanization, to the one in a far off village. It can easily fortify flours and batters of major grains used in households without changing their taste or texture. It helps in the growth of healthy bacteria, controlling obesity and high cholesterol levels, and has anti carcinogenic properties. Packaged food companies would benefit by adding it, as it will increase nutritional value and shelf life due to its anti-oxidant properties, also benefiting retailers. It will also produce an additional revenue stream for the local fruit juice vendors and industries by selling their leftover peels and pomace.

Potential

Ekayu aims to work with by-products of fruit juice and processing industry that would otherwise be discarded, turning it into powder with enormous health benefits making us an unique food processing facility. Due to lack of awareness and proper understanding of processing techniques, millions of tonnes of fruit pomace and peels is wasted annually. Our solution has a potential to create Dietary Fiber Powder enough to meet nutritional demands of approximately 0.9 billion people and also save money spent on discarding the waste. Our solution will help in reducing food wastage by extending the shelf life of packed food. It will also create a new market to support local economy. Our process and supply chain design have a relatively low startup cost, thus enabling low price and easy scalability.

Business Case

We'll collect fruit pomace & peels from local juice vendors & fruit processing industries, transport it to the nearest processing unit and convert it into powder using drying & extraction method. Our customers include households & food industries that use flour/batter as main ingredient. Our product is affordable & accessible because of the cheap raw material, economical process and optimized logistics via mobile app. Initial traction will be achieved by working closely with local vendors and industries for collection. After capacity expansion, we will also venture into B2C, increasing RnD and extending our reach to the unsold vegetables in market as raw material.Our marketing strategy is to have on-ground sales reps for B2B, and to create awareness through doctors and advertizing for B2C.

Objectives:

  1. Waste to Wealth - Utilizing juice industry leftovers to produce High Fiber Ekayu Powder
  2. Meeting Nutritional demand of people - To increase the daily dietary fiber intake
  3. Better living standards for farmers and juice vendors - It will create a new revenue stream for them

Team Ekāyu

Mumbai, India

Our Team

Ekayu's contribution to a "Zero fruit waste economy" / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

Ekayu's contribution to a "Zero fruit waste economy"

Everyone is aware of the fact that with time, the resources are depleting. The current backbone of nearly every technology is the end product. The shrinking landfill zones, depletion of water resources, heavy metal poisoning, population growth and many such modern problems have one thing is common, which is inability to create new resources to sustain such a large human population. The main aim of a zero fruit waste economy is to find solution to two major problems, i.e. reduction of waste from a production process and using the same to enhance nutritional property of the product.
The concept of "Ekayu powder" is unique in its own as its not a fortified powder, but is meant to fortify the currently existing products. The technology developed to prepare this powder aims at formulating it in a way which can be readily mixed with commonly used flours and enhance the physical properties of the food.
One may ask that why has it not been done before, if its sounds that easy?
In our view, the ancient medical textbooks of India such as Charak Samhita and Ayurveda, have already mentioned the fruit fibre preparations in treating many disorders. As said by Hippocrates "Let your food be the medicine", the Indian preparations mention the recipes, which can prevent diseases such as coronary heart diseases from happening. The possible mechanism to prevent such life style disorders is a continuous supply of ingredients such as dietary fibre in food. As shown in many studies, the fibres are food for our gut bacteria, also called prebiotics. Thus, Ekayu powder is perhaps an easier approach to tackle a range of lifestyle disorders.
The requirement of preparing a powder instead of directly consuming peels is related to the ease and safety of the product. Due to presence of bioactives and sugars in a rich moisture environment, the spoilage of peels is quick. This is one of the challenges involved in preparing the formulation, a vacuum drying at low temperature is under trials and methods such as microwave drying were already found to be working. The next challenge is energy requirement which can be researched upon, based on the quantity of feedstock to be dried at a given time.
Nevertheless, Ekayu powder supports the fruit processing economy by reaching one step closer towards a zero waste processing.

Ekayu Mobile App / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

Ekayu Mobile App

Ekayu launches a beta version of our Mobile App with the following objectives:
To connect with our suppliers
To optimize our logistics
To create awareness about the importance of leftovers
To educate people about the waste segregation techniques

<VISION, SOLUTION, IMPACT> / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

<VISION, SOLUTION, IMPACT>

Indian consumer perspective on available fibre based products

Malnutrition in India is a severe health problem as identified by WHO. In a scenario where a major percentage of population resides in rural India, fortified product's demand largely depends on its brand imaging, price and popularity. The awareness and taste was largely found to be affecting the fibre based product's demand, for instance whereas maggi oats noodles instantly became a household name due to brand imaging of Maggi, only a minor part of population was found to be aware of Quaker oats.
The consumption pattern was also found to be a major factor. A food mix preparation such as Ekayu may be an easier product to gain quick popularity due to its ease of mixing with existing staple food preparations.

Process Flow Diagram / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

Process Flow Diagram

Here is the brief to our Process flow diagram for converting waste to Dietary Fiber and its potential applications

Our Mission

All the members of our team are well aware of the food crisis and the impact it has on our society. Agriculture is the backbone of Indian economy, still, there are many people in India who don't get enough food to eat. We believe that nutritional food is the basic human right and to achieve this, we have to bring technological innovation in agriculture and food management. We are here with the pioneering and innovative solution to tackle food wastage, food shortage and malnutrition. We believe with a right mix of enthusiasm and skill set working together we will bring a positive change in the society.

Our Background

We are a diverse team of five students from IIT Bombay. Jhumur and Ramakrishna are PhD students working on food and waste processing techniques. They have a rich experience in this field and wish to extract and formulate eco-friendly nutrients from all the organic waste. They both have also authored a paper in this field. Tanmay is a chemical engineering student and is pursuing minor in computer science. He is the master of data and statistics and loves to apply it to solve real life problems. Rishi is a chemical engineering student by the day and an entrepreneur by the night. Rishabh is a chemical engineering student who believes a right mix of engineering and business is the way to solve social problems.

Ekayu's contribution to a "Zero fruit waste economy" / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

Ekayu's contribution to a "Zero fruit waste economy"

Everyone is aware of the fact that with time, the resources are depleting. The current backbone of nearly every technology is the end product. The shrinking landfill zones, depletion of water resources, heavy metal poisoning, population growth and many such modern problems have one thing is common, which is inability to create new resources to sustain such a large human population. The main aim of a zero fruit waste economy is to find solution to two major problems, i.e. reduction of waste from a production process and using the same to enhance nutritional property of the product.
The concept of "Ekayu powder" is unique in its own as its not a fortified powder, but is meant to fortify the currently existing products. The technology developed to prepare this powder aims at formulating it in a way which can be readily mixed with commonly used flours and enhance the physical properties of the food.
One may ask that why has it not been done before, if its sounds that easy?
In our view, the ancient medical textbooks of India such as Charak Samhita and Ayurveda, have already mentioned the fruit fibre preparations in treating many disorders. As said by Hippocrates "Let your food be the medicine", the Indian preparations mention the recipes, which can prevent diseases such as coronary heart diseases from happening. The possible mechanism to prevent such life style disorders is a continuous supply of ingredients such as dietary fibre in food. As shown in many studies, the fibres are food for our gut bacteria, also called prebiotics. Thus, Ekayu powder is perhaps an easier approach to tackle a range of lifestyle disorders.
The requirement of preparing a powder instead of directly consuming peels is related to the ease and safety of the product. Due to presence of bioactives and sugars in a rich moisture environment, the spoilage of peels is quick. This is one of the challenges involved in preparing the formulation, a vacuum drying at low temperature is under trials and methods such as microwave drying were already found to be working. The next challenge is energy requirement which can be researched upon, based on the quantity of feedstock to be dried at a given time.
Nevertheless, Ekayu powder supports the fruit processing economy by reaching one step closer towards a zero waste processing.

Ekayu Mobile App / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

Ekayu Mobile App

Ekayu launches a beta version of our Mobile App with the following objectives:
To connect with our suppliers
To optimize our logistics
To create awareness about the importance of leftovers
To educate people about the waste segregation techniques

<VISION, SOLUTION, IMPACT> / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

<VISION, SOLUTION, IMPACT>

Indian consumer perspective on available fibre based products

Malnutrition in India is a severe health problem as identified by WHO. In a scenario where a major percentage of population resides in rural India, fortified product's demand largely depends on its brand imaging, price and popularity. The awareness and taste was largely found to be affecting the fibre based product's demand, for instance whereas maggi oats noodles instantly became a household name due to brand imaging of Maggi, only a minor part of population was found to be aware of Quaker oats.
The consumption pattern was also found to be a major factor. A food mix preparation such as Ekayu may be an easier product to gain quick popularity due to its ease of mixing with existing staple food preparations.

Process Flow Diagram / Published January 15, 2017 by Tanmay Lad

Process Flow Diagram

Here is the brief to our Process flow diagram for converting waste to Dietary Fiber and its potential applications

Our Team

Our Mission

All the members of our team are well aware of the food crisis and the impact it has on our society. Agriculture is the backbone of Indian economy, ...Read More

Our Background

We are a diverse team of five students from IIT Bombay. Jhumur and Ramakrishna are PhD students working on food and waste processing techniques. They have a rich ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.