Jack of all Fruits

All vegan. All social. All sustainable.

Nurturing ignored jackfruit trees with Mauritian families to make nutritious and tasty jackfruit cutlets for herbivores & carnivores alike.

Use Case

Producers: Emi lives in Moka and like many people, owns ignored jackfruit trees. Enrolled in Jack of all Fruits (JOAF) partnership program, Emi works with a University of Mauritius student to nurture the trees and gain income by selling the jackfruits to JOAF. Agriculture student Al is with the JOAF program because he wants to gain work experience supported by professionals and peers. Consumers: Ray wants to eat more sustainable but misses meat’s texture. He finds JOAF cutlets in supermarkets and experiment to make pulled pork, tuna melt, and meatballs, while getting carbohydrates, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Jo is a vegetarian who loves cooking jackfruit but hates the hassle. She finds convenient JOAF cutlets that are minimally processed and retain the freshness, crunch, and color.

Potential

Jackfruit is an underutilized (> 70% wasted) nutrient dense crop that is disease & climate change resilient. With an unsustainable meat industry and growing demand for plant-based diet, JOAF uses jackfruit to produce versatile meat substitutes, attractive in taste and being minimally processed, which elongate shelf life of potential food waste while boosting the economy by empowering local Mauritians to be entrepreneurs and bridging academic and local communities through the agriculture student internship program. With a low startup cost and locally sourced materials and labor, the model can be adapted in countries like India with jackfruit waste. Potential side products include the protein and nutrient rich seeds used to enhance the cutlets and biofuel made from rinds for production.

Business Case

JOAF is a social enterprise working with agriculture students and families to nurture ignored jackfruit trees. Currently, a toolkit being developed in the University of Mauritius mentored by a professor. The jackfruit is purchased from the families at market price and processed locally into JOAF cutlet. Products will be distributed to Mauritian shops and specialty shops overseas. In the long term, JOAF can be found on shelves globally, with target marketing in Europe & North America with growing interest in sustainable eating and Asia where jackfruit is popular. A humanistic approach in advertising is used, where families can share stories to encourage support from the global community. Continued success means adapting the toolkit and model to India where jackfruit waste is prominent.

Objectives:

  1. All vegan: nutritiously vegan Jack of all Fruit cutlets, minimally processed, versatile and satisfying to carnivores and herbivores.
  2. All social: work with agriculture students to empower Mauritian families to be entrepreneurs & farmers by nurturing ignored jackfruit trees.
  3. All sustainable: extend shelf life of jackfruit destined to be wasted and tackle unsustainable meat consumption one cutlet at a time.

Team Jack of all Fruits

Moka, Mauritius

Our Team

Our Youtube channel! / Published January 17, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Our Youtube channel!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg9nrAilkyLmcvHEKSIfNRg

Do you want to stay up to date with Jack of all Fruit's progress? Subscribe to our Youtube channel for fun clips!

Way to go! / Published January 16, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Way to go!

Another day, another weekly/ bi-weekly three-way/ four-way Google hangout with this all girl power group! Here we are, at our planning meeting for the pitch and concept video, putting months of hard work, debates, negotiation, experiments, tears, laughter, and love for food innovation into 120 seconds or less.

Glad to commemorate this incredible journey with this typical photo. Thank you Thought for Food for one hell of a ride!

Fan Club! / Published January 15, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Fan Club!

https://www.facebook.com/JackofallFruits/

Oh me oh my! We have more than 100 fans on Facebook! Thank you for your love and support.

Check out our Facebook page, where we post the latest updates and amazing food innovation and sustainability news from around the globe!

https://www.facebook.com/JackofallFruits/

Live Testing! / Published January 15, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Live Testing!

Check out this tasting with a chef of 14 years experience from London! He recommends it for his restaurants especially as an option for vegetarians, and most importantly, thinks it is delicious.

We have held tastings for 20 people with positive reviews, praising the texture, taste, and most importantly, the positive impact on the community.

Check out the video here:
https://youtu.be/DBBKSAVcP7w

From raw jackfruit to cooked cutlets - prototyping madness! / Published January 15, 2017 by dhanishta meetoo

From raw jackfruit to cooked cutlets - prototyping madness!

The jackfruit was washed to remove twigs and dust particles and then sliced, peeled, trimmed and cut into small cubes.

A chemical dip is then performed. This is to ensure the jackfruit maintain its texture, color, and also has an extended shelf life. After some experimentation, we used a chelating agent, citric acid, which binds to the metal ion to sequester divalent ions, since the presence of copper ions is essential for PPO to be active. There is still room to explore on different agents.

They were then blanched at approximately 95 degrees Celsius for 15 minutes. Blanching inactivates enzymes which are responsible for browning. Care is taken that the jackfruit is neither under blanched as this will stimulate enzymes which is worse than no blanching nor over blanched that can result in cooked texture and quality loss.

Furthermore, the jackfruit were left to cool for around 15 minutes and then sealed in a plastic bag which was left in the freezer for 5 days.

Afterwards, the frozen jackfruit was thawed for about 15 minutes at room temperature. The pre treated jackfruit were boiled for 15 minutes and then they were left to cool.

After cooling, the jackfruit was mashed and mixed with boiled potatoes and spices and made into shape of cutlets. Finally, the cutlets were fried and served hot.

Our Mission

Jackfruit trees are treasures forgotten in every home’s backyard in Mauritius. They are miraculous plants that are climate change resilient, drought resilient, and disease resilient. Although jackfruits are rich in minerals, vitamins, and protein, they are terribly underutilized and neglected, often wasted in bulk. The meat industry is the second largest contributor to climate change, next to the energy industry. There is a rapidly growing demand for healthier, better quality, and more sustainable meat substitutes. Jackfruit, with its tested texture close to pulled meat, tuna, and other meat products, has grown popular around the world. Jack of All Fruits works with local families in Mauritius to tap into the rich resources just at their backyard, turning jackfruit into delicious and nutritious meat substitute. Working with the University of Mauritius, agriculture students provide advice and guidance to families, and we empower local families to become entrepreneurs through buying the jackfruit at a competitive price. The jackfruit is minimally processed to retain nutrients but elongate shelf life and made into thick and juicy jackfruit burgers and cutlets. 100% vegan, 100% socially responsible.

Our Background

We are a team of international students with expertise in innovative agriculture, communications, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. Kala studies management information systems in California and is focused on spreading unconventional ideas on sustainability. Dhanishta and Manisha are both food science students from Mauritius who are passionate about creative and innovative ways to tap into natural resources of their tropical homeland. Manisha had conducted scientific studies on the development and quality of jackfruit burgers in the Food Technology laboratory of the Faculty of Agriculture, the University of Mauritius, as part of the her final year dissertation for her undergraduate course in Food Science and Technology. Josephine studies global health and social entrepreneurship. She believes that food innovation can be a major catalyst for sustainable social change. Together we form a dynamic and international team, drawing insights from different culture and disciplines, with a single goal in mind - sustainable food innovations that leverage unexpected resources around the world.

Our Youtube channel! / Published January 17, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Our Youtube channel!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg9nrAilkyLmcvHEKSIfNRg

Do you want to stay up to date with Jack of all Fruit's progress? Subscribe to our Youtube channel for fun clips!

Way to go! / Published January 16, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Way to go!

Another day, another weekly/ bi-weekly three-way/ four-way Google hangout with this all girl power group! Here we are, at our planning meeting for the pitch and concept video, putting months of hard work, debates, negotiation, experiments, tears, laughter, and love for food innovation into 120 seconds or less.

Glad to commemorate this incredible journey with this typical photo. Thank you Thought for Food for one hell of a ride!

Fan Club! / Published January 15, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Fan Club!

https://www.facebook.com/JackofallFruits/

Oh me oh my! We have more than 100 fans on Facebook! Thank you for your love and support.

Check out our Facebook page, where we post the latest updates and amazing food innovation and sustainability news from around the globe!

https://www.facebook.com/JackofallFruits/

Live Testing! / Published January 15, 2017 by Josephine Liang

Live Testing!

Check out this tasting with a chef of 14 years experience from London! He recommends it for his restaurants especially as an option for vegetarians, and most importantly, thinks it is delicious.

We have held tastings for 20 people with positive reviews, praising the texture, taste, and most importantly, the positive impact on the community.

Check out the video here:
https://youtu.be/DBBKSAVcP7w

From raw jackfruit to cooked cutlets - prototyping madness! / Published January 15, 2017 by dhanishta meetoo

From raw jackfruit to cooked cutlets - prototyping madness!

The jackfruit was washed to remove twigs and dust particles and then sliced, peeled, trimmed and cut into small cubes.

A chemical dip is then performed. This is to ensure the jackfruit maintain its texture, color, and also has an extended shelf life. After some experimentation, we used a chelating agent, citric acid, which binds to the metal ion to sequester divalent ions, since the presence of copper ions is essential for PPO to be active. There is still room to explore on different agents.

They were then blanched at approximately 95 degrees Celsius for 15 minutes. Blanching inactivates enzymes which are responsible for browning. Care is taken that the jackfruit is neither under blanched as this will stimulate enzymes which is worse than no blanching nor over blanched that can result in cooked texture and quality loss.

Furthermore, the jackfruit were left to cool for around 15 minutes and then sealed in a plastic bag which was left in the freezer for 5 days.

Afterwards, the frozen jackfruit was thawed for about 15 minutes at room temperature. The pre treated jackfruit were boiled for 15 minutes and then they were left to cool.

After cooling, the jackfruit was mashed and mixed with boiled potatoes and spices and made into shape of cutlets. Finally, the cutlets were fried and served hot.

Our Team

Our Mission

Jackfruit trees are treasures forgotten in every home’s backyard in Mauritius. They are miraculous plants that are climate change resilient, drought resilient, and disease resilient. Although jackfruits are ...Read More

Our Background

We are a team of international students with expertise in innovative agriculture, communications, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. Kala studies management information systems in California and is focused on ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.