Project Initus

A bit more herbivore.

Project Initus is a B2B service, instructing on efficient production of nutritious vegetarian cold cuts tailored for regional conditions.

Use Case

The service is designed in a way that producers get a well planned and failsafe food that can be manufactured economically on the long run. After research on raw materials, supply chain, economics and demographics, a specialized product is developed for them. Until the upscaling, no personal presence is necessary, therefore this can be carried out cost-efficiently. Consumers can purchase the product on the market or in the shop, depending on wether it requires cold storage. These customers mostly come from areas where farming is has limited possibilities. After opening, the cold storaged product’s 3-4 days shelf-life makes it suitable to provide daily nutrition as a sidemeal. Also due to the intact shelf-life of at least 1 month the product keeps its value on the market.

Potential

As of now, there is no precedent of universal product development methodology targeting the elimination of undernourisment. A huge portion of the population of the world will be underfed if there is no effort to do this efficiently. Project Initus is the first initiative on the technical side of this aim, therefore a pioneering concept in this endeavor. Our intention is to search for producers, assess supply chains and uniquely design low-cost and high-nutrition vegetable cold-cuts, granting inexpensive acces to healthy food in any places on Earth where undernourisment is an issue. As fighting famine is a priority for the UN, we hope to become a strategic partner in this effort, to effectively seek out potential producers and distributors.

Business Case

There are basically three aspects that can keep the enterprise viable and sustainable. Since it is difficult to predict how agriculture and economics will perform in regions where population growth can be foreseen, there will be obvious demand for methods that can be easily implemented independently of these circumstances. This means a constant room for innovation, the main factor of its success is efficiency, which can be ensured by global uniformization and local individualization. Another reason is the constantly growing population, therefore a never ending demand for cheap and nutritious food, even after 2050. The third is the fact that different food products apart from a cold cut can be designed and refined in a similar systematic approach.

Objectives:

  1. Creating a global service that designs similarly produced but functionally and compositionally adapted food for undernourished people.
  2. Conversion of wasted but yet unspoiled vegetables and fruits into preserved nutrient sources in the form of cold cuts.
  3. Decreasing the ecological footprint of nutrient intake compared to food of animal origin, which also lowers the exploitation of resources.

Team Initus

Budapest, Hungary

Our Team

Global summit participation / Published March 27, 2017 by István Kertész

Global summit participation

The Initus Team is going to visit the Global Summit, we hope to see some interesting concepts and debates. Especially the professional feedback, the experts' perspective is going to be one of the most important feature of the event that we look for, it's too valuable of an opportunity to miss.

How complex the problem is? / Published February 10, 2017 by István Kertész

How complex the problem is?

http://theconversation.com/is-a-vegetarian-diet-really-more-environmentally-friendly-than-eating-meat-71596

A great article about the complexity of the exact problem we aim to solve: "Air freighting of green beans from Kenya into the UK was seen as unsustainable because of air miles but it also supports up to 1.5m people and livelihoods in some of the poorest regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. (...) it is day-to-day food waste – both at home and in supply chains – that can make any diet unsustainable whether you choose to be vegan, vegetarian, a meat eater or a combination of these. Different preservation formats can reduce food waste to zero. (...) of course we can source more food locally and seasonally as well as considering preserved options if we want to cut down on air miles."

Human Centered Design at work / Published February 7, 2017 by István Kertész

Human Centered Design at work

Team Initus has just joined "Design Kit: The Course for Human-Centered Design" online course organized by IDEO.org and +Acumen!
Can't wait to explore the benefits of HCD presented by professionals :)

Resources / Published January 23, 2017 by István Kertész

Resources

Our resources for the development of the concept and product:

- FAO world hunger map 2015, FAO Statistics Division
- SOFI 2015
- FAO Sustainable Development Goal Indicators
- 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
- Dietary protein quality evaluation in human nutrition - Report of an
FAO Expert Consultation, ISBN: 978-92-5-107417-6
- Nutritional composition and antinutritional factors of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum L.) undergoing different cooking methods and germination. DOI: 10.1023/A:1013189620528
- The Field Guide to Human-Centered Design, ISBN: 978-0-9914063-1-9
- Stanford d.school Bootcamp bootleg 2010. v2
- Puigjaner, L., Heyen, G.: Computer Aided Process and Product Engineering, ISBN: 978-3-527-30804-0
- Röös, E.: Analysing the Carbon Footprint of Food, Doctoral Thesis, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Uppsala 2013.
- nutritiondata.self.com/
- FAOSTAT database
- Wikimedia Commons
- cleanmetrics.com

Behind the scenes #1: photoshoot / Published January 17, 2017 by István Kertész

Behind the scenes #1: photoshoot

Our Mission

Our team, Initus created a product, which bears the ability to lower food waste and at the same time provides a high amount of valuable nutritients at a significantly lower footprint. It can be implemented at any location on Earth, where vegetables and food production resources are present. We firmly believe that our concept could be the first trendsetting initiative towards creating a global standard for developing locally adaptable and environmentally friendly foodstuff; hence the name Initus. The concept is ready for takeoff, won national and international awards, and at the moment we are developing the toolset to optimize the product for the demands of different regions. Needless to say, it also tastes good :)

Our Background

Our team has three members, all of us attending Szent István University in Hungary. Eszter is finishing her MSc studies as a food security and quality engineer, and has a food engineer bachelor degree. Fanni already has two bachelor degrees, animal husbandry engineering and applied environmental research, she is currently studying environmental management agricultural engineering. István is a food science PhD student researching food phyisics and has graduated as a process developer food engineer. As young scientists we are aspired to leave a mark, we believe our knowledge and skills are up to the task. Also we recognize that climate change and the constantly growing population of Earth are creating a very fragile future, our objective is to contribute to the solution of these problems in the ways we can.

Global summit participation / Published March 27, 2017 by István Kertész

Global summit participation

The Initus Team is going to visit the Global Summit, we hope to see some interesting concepts and debates. Especially the professional feedback, the experts' perspective is going to be one of the most important feature of the event that we look for, it's too valuable of an opportunity to miss.

How complex the problem is? / Published February 10, 2017 by István Kertész

How complex the problem is?

http://theconversation.com/is-a-vegetarian-diet-really-more-environmentally-friendly-than-eating-meat-71596

A great article about the complexity of the exact problem we aim to solve: "Air freighting of green beans from Kenya into the UK was seen as unsustainable because of air miles but it also supports up to 1.5m people and livelihoods in some of the poorest regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. (...) it is day-to-day food waste – both at home and in supply chains – that can make any diet unsustainable whether you choose to be vegan, vegetarian, a meat eater or a combination of these. Different preservation formats can reduce food waste to zero. (...) of course we can source more food locally and seasonally as well as considering preserved options if we want to cut down on air miles."

Human Centered Design at work / Published February 7, 2017 by István Kertész

Human Centered Design at work

Team Initus has just joined "Design Kit: The Course for Human-Centered Design" online course organized by IDEO.org and +Acumen!
Can't wait to explore the benefits of HCD presented by professionals :)

Resources / Published January 23, 2017 by István Kertész

Resources

Our resources for the development of the concept and product:

- FAO world hunger map 2015, FAO Statistics Division
- SOFI 2015
- FAO Sustainable Development Goal Indicators
- 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
- Dietary protein quality evaluation in human nutrition - Report of an
FAO Expert Consultation, ISBN: 978-92-5-107417-6
- Nutritional composition and antinutritional factors of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum L.) undergoing different cooking methods and germination. DOI: 10.1023/A:1013189620528
- The Field Guide to Human-Centered Design, ISBN: 978-0-9914063-1-9
- Stanford d.school Bootcamp bootleg 2010. v2
- Puigjaner, L., Heyen, G.: Computer Aided Process and Product Engineering, ISBN: 978-3-527-30804-0
- Röös, E.: Analysing the Carbon Footprint of Food, Doctoral Thesis, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Uppsala 2013.
- nutritiondata.self.com/
- FAOSTAT database
- Wikimedia Commons
- cleanmetrics.com

Behind the scenes #1: photoshoot / Published January 17, 2017 by István Kertész

Behind the scenes #1: photoshoot

Our Team

Our Mission

Our team, Initus created a product, which bears the ability to lower food waste and at the same time provides a high amount of valuable nutritients at a ...Read More

Our Background

Our team has three members, all of us attending Szent István University in Hungary. Eszter is finishing her MSc studies as a food security and quality engineer, and ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.