Unnat Neev

A foundation for a sustainable world

Using aquaponically grown protein and energy rich food, we aim to feed people and also empower farmers by educating them.

Use Case

At Unnat Neev, we aim to use a sustainable farming technique to feed the masses while providing equal opportunities for budding agriculture enthusiasts and existing growers to prosper. We will provide a protein and energy rich feed for people to suffice their daily energy requirements by supporting two biosystems- fishes (aqua) and our produce with zero waste generation. Soybean can be consumed in many ways by people across the world. Fermented soy tofu and tempeh have very high protein content. Plant waste will be utilized as protein rich animal feed by dairy farms in the locality which will give us better quality milk. All in all, we believe in creating a sustainable future for everyone.

Potential

Due to alarming rise in population, earth's natural resources won't suffice. Rapid urbanization in future will take a toll on the fertility of the soil, eventually degrading the quality of soil and ultimately reducing the yield. Therefore, our solution lies in multi-institutional farming that ensures more sustenance as we put to use otherwise dormant areas which couldn't have been cultivated using conventional farming. This multi-institutional farming complex houses facilities for rainwater and energy harvesting, education and skill development centre for budding agriculturists and existing growers, to make them self-reliant and educated to be able to face the adverse situation in foresight. Reduced dependance on water and controlled growth conditions means maximum output all year round.

Business Case

At Unnat Neev, we aim to create a sustainable farming technique with equal opportunities for budding agriculture enthusiasts and existing growers to prosper. On optimizing growth conditions for soybean, we aim to grow other super cereals and empower the existing growers by directly selling the produce to consumers. Initially, we will sell our produce to plants for further processing it to fermented products to enhance its nutritonal qualities. Later, we plan to set up our own processing units. Additional revenue can be generated by renting out spaces to offices in our complex thereby making the whole complex a self-reliant facility. Our technology solves the loopholes in the current distribution system too.

Objectives:

  1. Ensuring timely supply of food to the masses and monitoring of the entire supply chain from farm to folk
  2. Providing nutritious (protein and energy rich) and disease fighting food to combat hunger and build immunity simultaneously
  3. Utilization of wastes generated in the process sustainably in order to lay a foundation of a sustainable future for one and all

Team Unnat Neev

Mumbai, India

Our Team

Expert Input (3)... / Published January 16, 2017 by Medha Narang

Expert Input (3)...

page 2

Expert Input (3).. / Published January 16, 2017 by Medha Narang

Expert Input (3)..

page 1

WE DID IT! / Published January 15, 2017 by Medha Narang

WE DID IT!

After month and a half long time of learning, unlearning and relearning, Team Unnat Neev has lived through this competition in the right spirit. Each of the three individuals now feel empowered to bring about a positive change in the world. We know our efforts will be realized sooner or later. We won't stop here! The design lab contributes in a big way to the development of our concept. Thanks to TFF for making us realize the worth of our idea.
We shall continue to #fighthunger. Follow us on https://www.facebook.com/HydroVertPodPower

Global Foodies (3) / Published January 15, 2017 by Medha Narang

Global Foodies (3)

Does the world produce enough food to feed everyone?

The world produces enough food to feed everyone. For the world as a whole, per capita food availability has risen from about 2220 kcal/person/day in the early 1960s to 2790 kcal/person/day in 2006-08, while developing countries even recorded a leap from 1850 kcal/person/day to over 2640 kcal/person/day. This growth in food availability in conjunction with improved access to food helped reduce the percentage of chronically undernourished people in developing countries from 34 percent in the mid 1970s to just 15 percent three decades later. (FAO 2012, p. 4) The principal problem is that many people in the world still do not have sufficient income to purchase (or land to grow) enough food.

Global Foodies (2) / Published January 15, 2017 by Medha Narang

Global Foodies (2)

Children and hunger

Children are the most visible victims of undernutrition. Black et. al. (2013) estimate that undernutrition in the aggregate—including fetal growth restriction, stunting, wasting, and deficiencies of vitamin A and zinc along with suboptimum breastfeeding—is a cause of 3·1 million child deaths annually or 45% of all child deaths in 2011 (Black et al. 2013).

Our Mission

Our team consists of 3 members namely Medha, Pranav and Anas, from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai, India. Participating in the TFF challenge will give us an opportunity to put forth the idea of sustainable farming and effective supply chain before the world at large. It would also help us explore the existing problems like malnutrition, starvation and obesity and discover a significant panacea to combat these issues while also understanding the gravity of issues like water and land scarcity. We care for every individual's health and well being and it is our dream to contribute to a sustainable, happy and healthy tomorrow where each of the 9 billion people has access to wholesome food by 2050. We believe that satiating a man's hunger will provide the solutions to many other existing grave problems.

Our Background

“Eating and drinking are a pleasure as well as a necessity.” - Voltaire The above quote by Voltaire envisions our team to design foods that are nutritious and appealing to the senses and create a model for the efficient production, distribution and marketing so that they reach the masses. Thus, our team aims at improving the characteristics of pod plants by genetic engineering and using hydroponics based vertical farming for their growth. The pods will be packaged and labeled with RFID tags for complete monitoring of the supply chain. We aim to make the most of existent techniques coupled with highly efficient distribution system to ensure that no one goes to bed hungry. Future residential societies and offices will have green spaces for multi-level farming of various plants in a controlled environment. We aim to reduce dependence on horizontal farming and move to more sustainable means of farming. Thus, our idea not only provides the world population with nutritious food but also solves the bigger problems of PEM, unemployment, limitations of Horizontal farming, water scarcity and lead to a highly efficient food supply chain with minimal losses during its journey from farm to fork. We believe that satiating a man's hunger will provide the solutions to many other existing grave problems thereby enabling a happier and healthier world!

Expert Input (3)... / Published January 16, 2017 by Medha Narang

Expert Input (3)...

page 2

Expert Input (3).. / Published January 16, 2017 by Medha Narang

Expert Input (3)..

page 1

WE DID IT! / Published January 15, 2017 by Medha Narang

WE DID IT!

After month and a half long time of learning, unlearning and relearning, Team Unnat Neev has lived through this competition in the right spirit. Each of the three individuals now feel empowered to bring about a positive change in the world. We know our efforts will be realized sooner or later. We won't stop here! The design lab contributes in a big way to the development of our concept. Thanks to TFF for making us realize the worth of our idea.
We shall continue to #fighthunger. Follow us on https://www.facebook.com/HydroVertPodPower

Global Foodies (3) / Published January 15, 2017 by Medha Narang

Global Foodies (3)

Does the world produce enough food to feed everyone?

The world produces enough food to feed everyone. For the world as a whole, per capita food availability has risen from about 2220 kcal/person/day in the early 1960s to 2790 kcal/person/day in 2006-08, while developing countries even recorded a leap from 1850 kcal/person/day to over 2640 kcal/person/day. This growth in food availability in conjunction with improved access to food helped reduce the percentage of chronically undernourished people in developing countries from 34 percent in the mid 1970s to just 15 percent three decades later. (FAO 2012, p. 4) The principal problem is that many people in the world still do not have sufficient income to purchase (or land to grow) enough food.

Global Foodies (2) / Published January 15, 2017 by Medha Narang

Global Foodies (2)

Children and hunger

Children are the most visible victims of undernutrition. Black et. al. (2013) estimate that undernutrition in the aggregate—including fetal growth restriction, stunting, wasting, and deficiencies of vitamin A and zinc along with suboptimum breastfeeding—is a cause of 3·1 million child deaths annually or 45% of all child deaths in 2011 (Black et al. 2013).

Our Team

Our Mission

Our team consists of 3 members namely Medha, Pranav and Anas, from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai, India. Participating in the TFF challenge will give us an ...Read More

Our Background

“Eating and drinking are a pleasure as well as a necessity.” - Voltaire The above quote by Voltaire envisions our team to design foods that are nutritious and ...Read More

The information contained here represents student project ideas developed as the result of brainstorming activities during Round 1 of the TFF Challenge. It does not represent any final business plans or commercial products.